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Greg Monroe doesn’t receive contract extension, will become free agent

Greg Monroe, as expected, did not receive a contract extension before last night’s deadline. He’ll become a restricted free agent this summer.

Now, the Pistons have 111 days – until the trade deadline – to determine whether Monroe deserves a max contract. As I wrote a month ago:

The Pistons must determine whether Monroe deserves a max contract. If they deem he doesn’t, they must trade him, because he all but certainly will get one next summer.

As a restricted free agent, Monroe could receive an offer sheet from any team. If the Pistons don’t give him a max contract, someone else will. At that point, Detroit would have the option to match the offer.

If the Pistons are willing to match any offer, there’s no problem here. If they’re not, they can’t let themselves get put into that position, because that would mean losing Monroe for nothing if the offer gets too high — and it surely will get as high as the collective bargaining agreement allows.

21 Comments

  • Nov 1, 20138:38 am
    by RyanK

    Reply

    If he plays as hard as he did in game one, he deserves it.  That was one of his best efforts ever.  The stat box showed an impressive performance, but his defensive effort that doesn’t show there was very solid.  The problem with Greg Monroe is he rarely puts forth a full effort…particularly on the defensive end.  And for those who will chime in about rebounding being defense!!  No, it’s not.  It’s a different category from defense and is in fact measured on a stat sheet.

    Defensive effort doesn’t show up in the stat sheet, so Monroe has rarely put a lot of effort into over his NBA career.  The problem is we expect the effort over the next 5 years…his first three years indicate he will not put in that kind of effort on the defensive end over the long-term.  

    Maybe Sheed and CBill are influencing him to work harder on a nightly basis…although neither of those guys were role models for effort while they were pistons.  

    • Nov 1, 201311:19 am
      by geof

      Reply

      Maybe with no one else to score in the past 3 years he HAD to take somewhat of a break on D so he’d have the energy to put forth max effort on O. Maybe now he realizes he has other talented players to play with so he’ll be able to put forth the appropriate levels of effort to effectively play D. Everyone said that his defense at USA Camp was stellor.

      • Nov 1, 20131:35 pm
        by Max

        Reply

        I don’t know about the defense.   Gortat made him look really flat footed a couple of times.  

    • Nov 1, 20133:52 pm
      by oats

      Reply

      If appearing in a stat sheet means it isn’t defense, does that mean that steals and blocks are not defense too? I don’t hate the idea that basketball consists of offense, defense, and rebounding. It’s not how I look at it, but it’s a reasonable outlook. I do think the fact that rebounds showing up in the stat sheet is a terrible proof for that idea though.

  • Nov 1, 20139:33 am
    by @GPMasters

    Reply

    It’s squeaky bum time. Sort of.

  • Nov 1, 201310:06 am
    by deusXango

    Reply

    Greg Monroe is not a low-post offensive monster, rebounding machine, who plays demonic defense; you can count those in the NBA who are on one hand, but two out of three ain’t bad. What we have is a big man with a unique offensive skillset, who rebounds well…Drummond and Smith do the heavy lifting on defense, and Smith in particular is a complimentary two-way player. Why the local writers get so caught up in how much Monroe should be paid is beyond me, when you talk about trading a player of his caliber, on a rookie contract, where will we get close to equal value? Since we signed Josh Smith, the media has had the hots to dump Monroe, why? The 3 big man rotation Detroit has now is going to be a thing of beauty, once chemistry is developed and Cheeks figures out how best to implement them. I think Joe is being wise by letting the market determine how much Monroe is worth, and we have an owner now who will pay for the talent to contend.  

    • Nov 1, 20131:18 pm
      by Otis

      Reply

      Asserting that this is a “thing of beauty” is just as ridiculous as saying “Monroe must go” on the other end. We don’t have nearly enough evidence to draw either conclusion. The only rational approach this early is cautious optimism or pessimism. Personally I have a hard time believing that you’re maximizing your assets by fielding a team where your best players don’t make each other better (and if that chart about +/- by big man combinations is any indication, it’s not looking like they complement each other).

      • Nov 1, 20133:47 pm
        by Jon

        Reply

        that was a really small sample size about the +/- chart. also its not that surprising that was the result as when all 3 were together, they were often playing against the wiz’s starters but when there were only 2 it was against some backups.  and about best players not complimenting one another, it makes sense that having all complimentary players is the best method to maximizing potential but its not an absolute requirement as shown by KD and Westbrook who don’t exactly compliment each other that well. they just kinda take turns on offense but they’re still effective due mainly to their otherworldly talent

        • Nov 1, 20135:40 pm
          by Otis

          Reply

          I can’t argue with any of this. My main point about their being complementary is that you’re about to make a VERY hefty investment in Monroe if you intend to keep the team together. In contrast to Durant and Westbrook, who might do a lot of the same stuff on the court as each other, at least they don’t really get in each other’s way. Putting two centers on the floor together is a whole other story if Greg doesn’t put his money where his mouth is on that midrange jumper.

  • Nov 1, 201312:25 pm
    by Corey

    Reply

    There’s no way they let Monroe go next summer, max contract or not. They would have to be INSANE to say they have to let Monroe leave because they’ll have to pay Drummond 2 years later. Absolute worst case is that they’ll match a max contract for Monroe, and then have 2 years to trade either him or Smith, before Drummond gets an extension. 

    • Nov 1, 20131:23 pm
      by Otis

      Reply

      Wait, so… it’s insane to “let him go” but you’re open to trading Monroe within the first two years of his max extension? In this case, I’m assuming you mean “let him walk for nothing” then? Because obviously that would be insane. But if you’re not married to Monroe, and if you’re open to trading him at some point, you’re NEVER going to get better value for him than if you traded him this very moment. He would have been worth even more this summer. His value diminishes by just a little every day. Perhaps it could be argued that if you want to trade him for picks/prospects you could make a killing by trading him in February, but not if you’re looking for win-now type of talent.
       
      The bottom line is that he has tremendous value as a trade chip, but you won’t get much for him in a sign-and-trade. And I don’t think he’s nearly as valuable once you’ve made him one of the highest paid players in the league. I know everyone in town has a schoolboy crush on him, but he is a flawed player and even a good portion of his supporters say they love him and want him here but don’t think he’s worth max money.

      • Nov 1, 20131:47 pm
        by Max

        Reply

        There is something to this but it’s all theoretical.   If the lineup doesn’t seem to be working out then the Dumars should explore trades but if he doesn’t find a great one then I don’t see a problem with resigning him with an eye to trading him whenever a great trade opens up.   I think Otis is right about Monroe’s trade value in theory but the specifics of other team’s situations means that timing is always as big a factor as anything else.  If Dumars decides Monroe should ideally go but can’t find the right trade, knowing he has two years to patiently wait for a trade to develop should allow him to find the right trade.   If he takes the tact that he must be traded within the next 111 days he might wind up settling or making a panic move.   The team is probably not going to really contend for a title until the Heat are done and Drummond is at least a couple of years older anyway so there is no rush.  

      • Nov 1, 20134:08 pm
        by oats

        Reply

        Why is he worth more now exactly? No one will trade for him that isn’t prepared to offer him a maximum deal anyways since they don’t want to lose him for nothing after giving up what it takes to get him. That would be colossally stupid. So I just don’t see why being on a max deal would significantly alter his trade value. Pretty much the only kind of trade that you can do now that would be unlikely on the maximum deal is a move for another player on their rookie contracts. That’s not really a lot of potential trade targets. Beal, Parsons, and Leonard would likely qualify, but none of them are likely to be available. Detroit should also consider Klay Thompson, but I doubt that happens either. I really can’t come up with much other than those unlikely targets where his value would be significantly altered by being on the deal the team trading for him would want him on anyways. If Detroit is trading for much of anyone else then they will need to package Monroe with a dead weight expiring like CV to make the contracts match, so it really isn’t that beneficial to the other team to get him now and they have no real incentive to give up more for Monroe now.
         
        The only other way his rookie deal would be valuable is if Detroit was looking to salary dump someone as part of moving Greg. The thing is, Detroit doesn’t have much in the way of salaries to dump. The only real candidate for a salary dump is Jerebko, and quite frankly his contract isn’t that bad. 

        • Nov 1, 20136:01 pm
          by Otis

          Reply

          For one thing, a team trading for him now gets basically a full season of production at an incredible value. So if they intend on maybe competing for a championship but trying to avoid paying the luxury tax, he’s an ideal addition. If it’s a lower level team that’s just trying to make a splash and take a leap or make a playoff push, he’ll help with that too. This also gives a team a chance to gauge him a little before making that max commitment to him. Also, if he was made available right now, I think a lot of teams would be interested, and a bidding war would help drive up the price. And even if the other team didn’t keep him, there’s at least the hope that they could say “hey, we tried” and try to salvage something for him in a sign-and trade. If you wait until the season is over, it’s a little more black and white, and frankly you’ve already sealed your fate in February that you’ll match a max contract and hope for the best. The team would also get his Bird rights, so if they were intent on keeping him, it’s a guarantee that you can match any offer. If a team covets Monroe and just wants to make him a free agent offer, they’re probably just going to get matched so those rights are priceless.
           
          I’ve made the Anibal Sanchez comparison in the past, if you’re a baseball fan. The Tigers gave up their top pitching prospect and a few lower level prospects for Sanchez and Omar Infante. Then, after Sanchez pitched well for them in the postseason, they signed him to a completely ludicrous contract. I didn’t like the trade for the very reason you’re talking about: It’s kind of a lose-lose. If he pitches poorly, you’ve made a bad trade. If he pitches well, you’re going to end up giving him some ridiculous contract. So yeah, I hated the trade and I still hate the trade. But it got done, and I’m sure the general manager considered them to be two separate transactions, even if the contract extension was pretty much an inevitability after the trade. GMs do a lot of surprising things in their efforts to improve their teams, and giving up perimeter talent and a pick for a 16 & 9 big man isn’t that crazy.
           
          I certainly think if Joe made him available there would be some very interesting and tempting offers out there. We’ll never know what could be, but as I’ve said numerous times in the past, these pieces better fit together in a pretty awe-inspiring way to justify having so much invested in the front court and so little on the perimeter.

          • Nov 1, 20139:37 pm
            by oats

            How many teams trying to win a title right now are also looking to dump salary? Seriously, that’s just not relevant given what the league looks like right now. I guess that gives you OKC who has nothing Detroit would want, and maybe Memphis who also has nothing Detroit would want and already has a crowded front court. I guess Indy could consider it, but once again they don’t have anything to offer that makes sense for Detroit without screwing up their own plans. Hint, Paul George is not going anywhere. Add it all up and I’ve got nothing. Anyone who is realistically making an offer that Detroit should entertain is planning to give him a max deal this summer anyways, so the value of doing it now instead of then is pretty much identical.
             
            As for the Sanchez trade, well, that’s a way different scenario actually. For one, Monroe is a very young near All Star and no one in the Sanchez trade actually has a similar value. The Tigers only sent away completely unproven young prospects for him. That would be the equivalent of the Pistons trading Monroe for Jeremy Lamb, Perry Jones, and Steven Adams. That is an awful trade for Detroit. To put it simply, the reason it happens that way in baseball is that they are playing a numbers game. The NBA is limited to 15 players and has no farm system so they can’t play that kind of numbers game. The NBA is all about assets, and Monroe is an asset that needs an actual return.
             
            More importantly, the Tigers actually did make two separate transactions. They decided that they needed a pitcher for a playoff run and they didn’t mind the fact that Sanchez might not work out or that he might leave. They felt their farm system had enough depth to take that the risk in the hopes that Sanchez would pan out, and the ability to evaluate him and gain a familiarity advantage in contract negotiations was worth the loss of a few guys that hadn’t really proven themselves as professional baseball players yet. In short, if things didn’t work out they wouldn’t have been that upset by the trade since they only sent away guys that hadn’t become actual Major League ball players yet. It should be noted that historically that is the right decision in baseball. It is almost always the right decision to move prospects for established players. The hit rate on even the best prospects is just so small that the it is hardly ever the correct decision to hold onto the prospects. So yes, the Tigers did not know ahead of time that they would sign Sanchez to that contract. Whoever trades for Monroe knows that they absolutely have to keep him or their GM will almost certainly be fired for butchering that move. It’s just a completely different scenario than the Sanchez move.
             
            Would Monroe get some interesting offers? Probably. Should Detroit entertain them? Definitely. Is his value going to drastically fall off by signing a max deal? I just don’t think so.

  • Nov 1, 201312:47 pm
    by @GPMasters

    Reply

    If he proves himself as truly worthy of being a max player, then his contract will not be an albatross anyway. Denver didnt have too much problem moving Nene soon after inking him to an extension.

    • Nov 1, 20131:49 pm
      by Max

      Reply

      This is a great point and you can apply it to other players.   Hibbert’s value for instance has definitely gone up since he signed his max deal.  

  • Nov 1, 201312:51 pm
    by jamesjones_det

    Reply

    It makes sense, only a few teams will be able to offer him a max deal which the Pistons can match.  With people hoping that Lebron and other opt out of their player options it’s reasonable to roll the dice and see if you can match a cheaper than max contract.

  • Nov 1, 20131:27 pm
    by Otis

    Reply

    Make no mistake, there was absolutely no reason to give him that contract and plenty of reason not to. If the result is that he gets an offer sheet the Pistons are unwilling to sign, then Dumars brought this upon himself and will be terminated. But face it, if they get that far they’re matching anything. Absolutely anything. Heck, they could trade him at the deadline and then offer him a max contract of their own. :)

  • Nov 2, 20131:59 am
    by James

    Reply

    San Antonio. Duncan’s on the way out, fact. If Pop stays, either Parker, Green and/or Leonard might be trade bait. Pop loves a functional big man who he can teach and ride into the playoffs. I’ve seen enough of Monroe to not give him anywhere near the contract Smith just signed. Dumars knowingly signed Smith because he fully intends to trade Monroe for a top tier wing or guard.

    • Nov 2, 201312:41 pm
      by Max

      Reply

      Pop has consistently said he will retire when Duncan retires.  

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