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Playing with Andre Drummond helps even those who looked beyond help

My column this week for the Detroit Free Press looks at how the resurgent play of Austin Daye, Charlie Villanueva and Will Bynum has been aided by Andre Drummond:

In a profile of Drummond, Beckley Mason of ESPN TrueHoop Network blog HoopSpeak wrote, “For now, stop looking for the nuances and artistry traditionally associated with franchise big men. Here’s what counts: Andre Drummond can dunk and rebound at the highest level in the NBA.”

Mason is exactly right, and those two high-level skills are precisely why Drummond makes the three oft-maligned, suddenly resurgent Pistons so much better. Offensive rebounds often lead to open perimeter shots as the defense scrambles to reset. No one in the league has been better on the offensive glass than Drummond this season. Drummond is tied for the league lead in offensive rebounding percentage with Cleveland’s Anderson Varejao. When you put Drummond and his offensive rebounding prowess on the court with capable shooters (albeit streaky ones) like Daye and Villanueva, it is bound to lead to good, open shots for them as the ball is tossed back out.

Bynum, on the other hand, is a penetrating guard known for his relentless, frenetic style and willingness to attack at all times. He can get to the basket, he can get off his shot surprisingly well for his size, but he also tends to get out of control, he doesn’t always make great decisions with the ball and he occasionally penetrates too deep, gets caught inside and doesn’t have a good option to pass out of it. Put him on the floor with a guy like Drummond, who has good hands, who is a fantastic finisher and who is one of the most athletic players in the league — meaning he can run with Bynum and corral bad passes that many other players would not be able to get to — and he’s bound to help turn what would’ve been a turnover or two into buckets.

Also, make sure to check out the HoopSpeak column by Mason mentioned in that excerpt above, including Mason’s very interesting comparison of Drummond to Tyson Chandler.

50 Comments

  • Jan 4, 201310:28 am
    by David

    Reply

    sounds great. you should include a link to your article in the freep

  • Jan 4, 201310:31 am
    by I HATE FRANK

    Reply

    I remember telling people maybe on this forum, and others…

    That Drummond was not a project….

    Thats a title the pistons management put on him to lower expectations….

    He is a game changer and physical force…

    some will say bring him along slowly, has caused this development…

    I say he already was ready…and after the first 10-12 games od the season he would have been up to speed….

    Now we are even starting to see his offensive game more and more…

    Never seen a big man get soo many steals and finishes in the open floor…

    He is the MOST ATHLETIC BIG! in the last Decade of the NBA….

    • Jan 4, 20133:15 pm
      by I HATE FRANK

      Reply

      None of those guys were or are over 260…. Yes Drummond…Lane agility and qucikness ranked among SG/SF at the combine….

      At the Combine his Vertical was more impressive Dwight…. he also had the quickness sprint time for a big man over 250 since NeNe

      In not talking about ability to play the game at a high level…. Im strictly talking recorded measurables… Drummond is the first of his kind….

      • Jan 4, 201310:06 pm
        by sebastian

        Reply

        Dre Drummond’s grasp of the ball from via the pass or off the glass/rim is tremendous.

  • Jan 4, 201310:43 am
    by Derek

    Reply

    In the last decade of the NBA?  The most athletic big?WOW.

    That would include Dwight Howard, D’Andre Jordan, Javale ‘Shaqt’n the Fool’ McGee, and Blake Griffin.

    You think he’s already more athletic than those guys.  If that’s the case, the Pistons are going to be a really really exciting team to watch.

    • Jan 4, 201310:57 am
      by tarsier

      Reply

      Yeah, I think I would hesitate to say more than that Drummond is up there with those guys. Still, he is looking to have Dwight Howard level upside. Can’t say whether he’ll reach that point, but it’s beyond ridiculous that such a guy would be available 9th in the draft.

      • Jan 4, 20132:28 pm
        by frankie d

        Reply

        i think the comparison, at least in terms of athleticism, between drummond and jordan and howard is very appropriate.
        in fact, drummond measures out – take a look at their respective numbers over at draftexpress, measurements that are legit because they are taken at the league’s pre-draft workout – like a bigger, stronger,  more physically mature twin of deandre jordan, with a marginally longer reach.
        and drummond is bigger and in some ways, quicker and faster than howard – again, according to the numbers from their workouts.
        have to say that i have never fully bought into the dwight howard hype.
        is he a good defensive player?  sure. his athleticism is pretty much unmatched by most big guys and he’s learned to use his quickness and size and length very effectively in guarding the lane.  no one plays the pick and roll like he does, at least since ben wallace’s prime.   and  he gets to hack the heck out of everyone and still stay on the floor and so he is able to play a style of physical defense no one else is allowed to play.
        however, in the playoffs the last couple of years, for whatever reason, refs started calling his games tighter and he was noticeably less effective and spent much more time on the bench in foul trouble.  also, howard lacks a certain flexibility as an athlete and that has been even more of a problem as he has bulked up and as his back has given him problems.  
        offensively, he is still a work in progress even after 9 years in the league.  it took him forever to move past the most basic offensive moves imaginable and his lack of offensive effectiveness cost the team dearly for many of his earlier years.  
        only in the last 2 or 3 years has he even incorporated simple stuff like a dependable jump hook and even now, he still has not developed a go-to move that he can rely on.
        his futility as an offensive player is why a guy like rasheed was able to make howard look stupid for all those years, despite the fact that a young howard should have been able to run circles around an old vet like sheed.
        imho, drummond is light years ahead of both jordan and howard offensively.  he has much better instincts than either player – watch some of his passes and that amazing fast break he ran a couple of games back – and he just has more developed offensive skills than either player has shown even to this point in their careers.  i’m not talking about the range on his jumper, which is nonexistent at this point, but his ability to handle the ball, make smart passes, see the floor on the offensive end, and make small adjustments around the basket, to get the ball on the rim.  (he may be hurt by that skill, actually, because sometimes he finesses the ball up to the basket instead of just powering it up.)
        drummond is not as good a defensive player as either howard or jordan, yet, but he combines jordan’s explosiveness and speed and quickness with howard’s power, a very unique combination.  he also has a “livelier” body – like jordan’s – than howard, a more flexible body than you’d ever expect a huge guy to have.  
        i think he just has to learn some things.  (best tutor imaginable – ben wallace – is waiting to come back for a decent offer!)  once he learns those things, he will be a dominant defender.  in fact, as a freshman, at uconn, i read somewhere that his low post defensive numbers were the best of any big man in college.  that is astounding and indicative of just how good he can become, once he actually knows what to do.
        athletically, he reminds me of the younger shaq, before shaq got lazy and put on a bunch of weight and lost some of his speed and flexibility.
        drummond is exactly what observers thought he was before he went to connecticut and got caught up in a tough situation there: an extremely unique athlete who could be a once in a lifetime players.  
        as a pistons’ fan, i’m just glad so many other GMs were to stupid to recognize what he truly is, and i’m also glad that joe d definitely has a tendency to gamble on such guys.
        drummond has to rank as one of joe d’s best moves, ever.  and no, it wasn’t a no-brainer, because 8 other teams couldn’t see the correctness of making the move. 

      • Jan 4, 20133:20 pm
        by I HATE FRANK

        Reply

        None of those guys were or are over 260…. Yes Drummond…Lane agility and qucikness ranked among SG/SF at the combine….
        At the Combine his Vertical was more impressive Dwight…. he also had the quickness sprint time for a big man over 250 since NeNe
        In not talking about ability to play the game at a high level…. Im strictly talking recorded measurables… Drummond is the first of his kind….

        Drummond went 9th because, of Uconn and expectations… i say it all this time…this was the draft of High Charecter and the High Motor…

        Drummond fell under the too good to be true, something has to be wrong with him

  • Jan 4, 201310:44 am
    by Ozzie-Moto

    Reply

    The Pistons should send him down to Houston for a month this summer to work on offensive moves with the most athletic big of all time. Hakeem “the Dream” Olajuwon Their speed and timing on defense is very similar. 

  • Jan 4, 201311:14 am
    by vic

    Reply

    stat heads hated on me for wanting Drummond on the Pistons… Now he’s not only dominating, but making everyone around him better. Systemic thinking works.

    The first unit would benefit from him too.
    Now if we had a PG or Small Forward that could also make those around him better, with a natural talent for court vision and awareness – and could shoot. The Pistons will be on the way to contention.

    MCW – IF and only if he improves his shooting.

    Otto Porter – SF of the future, kinda like a young Pippen.

    Trey Burke – doubt they go with him because he wouldn’t fit with Knight, and not athletic enough to defend well, but he’s basically Kyrie Irving lite. Superstar shooter, Superstar passer. If you put him next to a lockdown SG, you’ve got something. 

    • Jan 4, 20131:41 pm
      by tarsier

      Reply

      Were these stat heads you knew in your real world life? Because the PP crowd was overwhelmingly in favor of drafting Drummond if the Pistons were lucky enough to have him fall so far.

      There were a number of us who recognized his major bust potential. But even so, his potential for dominance made him the clear best choice. 

      • Jan 4, 20132:47 pm
        by frankie d

        Reply

        stat heads in the real world?  well that is debatable, but go back and read what the geniuses over at detroit bad boys said about drummond.
        they pride themselves on being stat heads, or whatever you want to refer to them as.
        according to them, john henson was the guy detroit should have been drafting at the 9 spot. 
        according to them, drummond was a disaster of a pick.  they were predicting utter disaster and praying that he not be chosen before he was chosen. 
        go back and read those posts on that site from the guys who run it.  they are hilariously wrong and dumb.
        (and it’s not even worth arguing with people, many of whom don’t even watch games, or watch them sporadically, and try to tell them that sometimes your eyes can tell you things that stats cannot.)
        i’m definitely a believer in using stats and numbers to gauge a player’s effectiveness and potential for success.  but sometimes, the numbers just don’t tell you certain things that you can only see with your eyes.  and sometimes, the experience of seeing players over decades is more valuable than looking at numbers on a chart in order to determine the value of a player.  and you have to be flexible enough, as someone judging talent, either as a fan or a scout or a GM or a blogger , to understand that basic fact. 

        • Jan 4, 20133:29 pm
          by tarsier

          Reply

          Ah, not a site I really follow. So I’ll take your word for it. I was just clarifying that on this forum, with few exceptions, everyone was bullish on Drummond.

          • Jan 4, 20134:01 pm
            by frankie d

            they are all about drummond now, but they were singing the blues when he was drafted.

  • Jan 4, 201312:13 pm
    by Big Rick

    Reply

    AWESOME DRE!!!

  • Jan 4, 201312:22 pm
    by Daye and Knight (Team Redemption)

    Reply

    “Hey guys, remember me? I remember when you all wanted me on your team so…are you guys still down?”

    -Royce White 

    • Jan 4, 20131:08 pm
      by Crispus

      Reply

      Royce White has become such a public punching bag. It’s a shame cause anxiety disorder is no picnic at the beach and he probably would be really good (Batum good?) on the right team. Not to say that he isn’t wearing any extended good will thin, but I get tired of everyone on in ESPN comments saying he should just “Man up”.

      • Jan 4, 20131:27 pm
        by Daye and Knight (Team Redemption)

        Reply

        I get that he has a problem, but he knew he would have to fly if he joined an NBA team. I’m not giving him “kid gloves” for that reason alone. He messed Houston up, they could have picked someone else but he led teams to believe that he would be able to contribute right away and get over flying. I feel sorry for the man, but I also feel sorry for Houston’s organization for wasting a pick. If commenters are telling him to “man up” it’s not that easy and maybe they don’t know how serious his situation is. With that being said he shouldn’t be in the NBA and drag a team down with him he should “man up” and get a 9-5 job like the rest of us

      • Jan 4, 20131:48 pm
        by tarsier

        Reply

        We have enormous expectations of pro athletes because they are blessed and privileged beyond the vast majority of persons in the world. So yeah, Royce White should man up.

        That said, if he wants to just quit, that’s fine. It’s his call. But to complain that Houston has not gone ever further above and beyond reasonable expectations to accommodate his problems than they have (which is way further than I’d expect most franchises to go)? Yeah, that’s pathetic. He should get over himself. We all have problems. They give us excuses. Admirable people don’t use those excuses.

        • Jan 4, 20132:15 pm
          by Keith

          Reply

          True anxiety disorder isn’t just learning to speak up in class/at work. You don’t just “man up.” There occurs an actual mis-wiring or chemical imbalance in the brain that cannot be fixed.
           
          We know almost nothing about the actual details of the situation. White claims he is following the advice of doctors and that Houston is actively ignoring that advice. Houston hasn’t really come out and said anything specific, but their lack of outward support lends to the idea that they either don’t understand or don’t validate the problem. From those standpoints, it’s hard to see how Royce is in the wrong. Most people don’t understand what real anxiety is to begin with, and mental disorders still retain a staggering social stigma in our culture. So of course the public doesn’t understand the depth of the problem, and just wants to blame the victim for not being more normal.

          • Jan 4, 20133:35 pm
            by tarsier

            I’m not saying that he can get over his issues by merely manning up. I mean that, if he can’t, he should find a way to reorient his life and do things so those issues don’t hold him back so much. Those are productive solutions, as opposed to complaining. This really isn’t all that different from Daye playing poorly because of his mom’s illness. It’s understandable, but if he wants the privilege of playing in the NBA, he can’t just complain about it; he has to find a way to overcome it.

            If he doesn’t, I won’t really hold it against him. He is too young to expect a whole lot out of. He would be a typical immature young man. But to receive respect (which typical immature young men do not usually get), he does need to man up in the manner described.

      • Jan 4, 20132:14 pm
        by Crispus

        Reply

        Well I think it just goes to show America’s desperate need for a modern high speed rail network.

        But seriously it would be easier for him to do an alternate travel plan if he was on a Midwestern or East Coast team. He’s bungled his chance to play an awareness-spreading pioneer, and he definitely could have paired D-league games (at least the home ones) with the team provided shrink to get a comfort level going. One good thing is that Houston is doing fine without him, the fans would really have the pitchforks and torches out if he was costing the team games.

        Originally I was %100 behind Royce Da 6’7″, but now I’m not so sure. Still, if the Pistons blow up the team at SF I’d take a chance on him. He’s being selfish, but not terribly immature. Can we trade for Royce and Scott Machado?

        • Jan 4, 20133:01 pm
          by vic

          Reply

          oh yeah i’d take Royce and Scott – two naturally talented passers.

          He’s taking his stand now but when he sees those millions about to disappear, he’ll get over the roadblocks real quick. He’s 21 years old, most 21 year olds make stupid decisions.

          His mind is getting clearer by the day, but his pride is making him stubborn.
          His next stop will get the benefit, that’s why Houston won’t trade him. 

  • Jan 4, 201312:41 pm
    by Ryank

    Reply

    Drummond opens the game up because his defender has to stay close to him.  Leave him for a second and it will likely result in a dunk over top.  Pick and roll is so dangerous because he can take lobs out of the air and throw them down…even if the lob isn’t thrown well.  They’re not giving up a jumpshot on the pick and roll, they are giving up a dunk if they don’t defend it honestly.
     
    It also changes his teammate’s mental approach.  They can pressure their man more on defense because he’s there to bail them out if a player drives inside.  Daye and CV are better defenders this year because the drive isn’t as much of a threat as it was before.  Confidence goes up when they can accomplish more good things on the basketball court…confidence is important for a shooter. 
     
    He makes his teammates better on both ends of the floor.  Drummond has the potential to be the Pistons first dominate big man in the time I’ve been watching them.  It’s hard to believe in 30 years the pistons haven’t have a dominate center…Brian Williams, Laimbeer, Edwards…none were dominate in the low post.  Sheed was good, but didn’t dominate the inside and couldn’t play as far above the rim.  Ben Wallace was always a one way player who could only dunk a lob if it was put right on target. 

    • Jan 4, 201312:53 pm
      by Keith

      Reply

      To be fair, even as offensively limited as he was, Ben was a dominant, game-changing defender. Sheed regularly shut down opposing big men as well. I agree Drummond has the change to be the first big dominant on both ends, but a player can dominate even if they are more one way than the other.

    • Jan 4, 20131:51 pm
      by tarsier

      Reply

      Thus far, Drummond is no more of an offensive threat than Ben Wallace was. He may develop more on that end, but both were dynamic defensive game changers who could play above the rim on the other end but couldn’t shoot anywhere near half decently.

      • Jan 4, 20131:58 pm
        by Revken

        Reply

        Agreed.  He may develop more of an offensive game, but he’s not much beyond Ben yet.  On D he’s not at Ben’s level yet, either, but clearly shows the potential to be great in a similar way.  No way to know what his ceiling is yet, but his present is already VERY GOOD.

      • Jan 4, 20132:19 pm
        by Keith

        Reply

        Ben had stone hands. He couldn’t play in the pick and roll, nor did he create shots on most of his offensive boards. Ben HAD to pass the ball back out because he had no touch to tip rebounds back in or even dunk/layup without a completely open basket. Drummond has already shown a useful offensive skill (PnR), where Ben never really did anything well on that end.

        • Jan 4, 20132:55 pm
          by frankie d

          Reply

          ben had stone hands and he had small hands.  not quite as bad as leon douglass or kwame brown, but his hands were not very good.
          drummond has huge, soft hands.  don’t know if they are quite as good as chris webber’s hands – the best i ever saw – but his ability to snag balls that otherwise would be turnovers, to use his hands to tip balls near the basket – those are extremely important talents that are strictly a result of the fact that mother nature blessed him with an amazing pair of hands.  
          if ben had had decent hands, he would have been a much better offensive player.
          john salley had the same problem.  while rodman had great hands, salley had small, not-quite-leon-douglass-bad hands.
          look at some of ben’s dunks.  like salley, he almost always cupped the ball between his hand and his wrist/forearm.  he just didn’t have hands big enough to do the kind of things that a guy like walter hermann could do with the ball.

        • Jan 4, 20133:41 pm
          by tarsier

          Reply

          I think you underestimate Ben’s hands. But maybe I’m biased because Big Ben is one of my top five favorite players ever. Either way, the facts you mention mean Drummond has more offensive upside. But he doesn’t yet have the skill, experience, and know-how to put him at a higher level than Wallace.

          • Jan 4, 20134:41 pm
            by frankie d

            i also loved ben.  loved his game. 
            but i think that he would have been an even better player, especially on the offensive end, if he’d been blessed with bigger hands.  
            imho, one of the dirty little secrets during his career was that he had such mediocre hands.
            to his credit, he did what he had to do to make up for that physical limitation, and, imho, did a darn good job of compensating.
            good hands is often the most overlooked asset or failing for big guys and it is something that even supposedly smart BB people overlook.
            for instance, how could any smart BB guy, like michael jordan, have ever been able to overlook the fact that kwame brown had such bad hands, and draft him number one?
            an amazing oversight. 

  • Jan 4, 201312:53 pm
    by Prelove

    Reply

    Great work. Thanks for sharing this patrick!

  • Jan 4, 201312:59 pm
    by LT

    Reply

    sometimes i wonder if you guys have a ten o clock bedtime. i do not think people typing these drummond/howrad commentsare watching the lakers. Howard is a diva, he was spoonfed since he got to the NBA. seems like the pistons are trying to keep Drummond humble by limiting his role. Drummond WILL be a beast. we must exercise patience 

    • Jan 4, 20131:53 pm
      by tarsier

      Reply

      Howard may be a diva, but he is still the best big man in the league (unless you count LeBron). His play is not as good this season, but he has built up enough of a background to give him the benefit of the doubt that that is because of his injury.

  • Jan 4, 20131:03 pm
    by Prelove

    Reply

    Patrick, I’ve been a piston fan since grade-school  I remember george blaha calling david wood “air wood” I remember Isiah’s last game of his career. Penny and the magic chuckling at Isiah while he was in pain. I loved reading dean howe’s articles in the flint journal on the pistons. Writing on here to tell you You’re my favorite pistons writer ever. I appreciate the time you put into these articles. Thanks.

  • Jan 4, 20131:06 pm
    by George

    Reply

    I love the fact that it seems like all the players love to be on the court with Drummond.  Everyone seems to step it up a notch because they know they could have an open jumper or assist when he is on the court.  Defensively, he really sets the tone.  It is amazing seeing how he can get away with playing the occasional gambling D and still make up spacing with his speed.  He plays tough yet barely ever fouls.  I actually liked seeing him get the hip check foul (last game) because at least he is making his fouls count.  It really weakens the opponents physically.

    Could you imagine if Drummond started?  I honestly think if he got 30 mins a game for 10 straight games, he could have a game of 20+ rbs.  He is a Love/Howard volume rebounder.  He can definitely see him being a “minimalist” scorer.  He only needs like 8-10 shots a game, half of which would probably be putbacks.  Like people said, get Hakeem or Kareem to teach him like 2 moves, and he will be good to go.  FT shooting will come over time, I wouldn’t be concerned.  If he can be a Tim Duncan type, and give you mid-60% FT, that will be good enough.

    If Monroe can step up his D, we could have a straight nasty defensive team for the next decade.  The Knicks started Chandler and Camby and they limited the Spurs to like 17 pts in the paint.  I think we could so something similar and absolutely dominate the paint with our bigs, especially with their rebounding.

    Sorry for the rambling but it is hard not to be giddy as a Piston fan.  We are so close to being a top-4 Eastern Conference team, especially since we already have the hard part down (quality bigs).  When we are at all cylinders, we have shown we can hang with the leagues best.  In fact, we are a match-up nightmare for them.  We just need some consistency….and a real pg.

    • Jan 4, 20131:22 pm
      by vic

      Reply

      agreed. 
      he’ll make the first unit play better too… When players have a teammate with a dominant advantage it gives them more confidence and they start playing to win instead of trying to save face. 

    • Jan 4, 20131:57 pm
      by Crispus

      Reply

      Sadly, even Old Camby has more defensive swag than Monroe. I would love for Monroe to become a decent defender but right now he’s hard to watch. DrumMonroe could still be a great tandem, but it might come to us getting another defensive big if we really want to close down the paint. It was supposed to be Kravtsov, but I since he is in absentia I say we trade Maxiell for a pick and sign Birdman Chris Andersen (as long as he’s innocent). 

  • Jan 4, 20132:24 pm
    by Crispus

    Reply

    Great writeup Patrick. Drummond really does make the team better and mostly just by doing the things he can do that other players can’t. Once he’s good enough to slow down the game and see the floor and adjust his play to the needs of that night’s game he’ll be an all star.

    I wonder how Frank is going to reconcile a bench that is fast paced and lovable and rich with redemption stories and performs miracles with a starting lineup that is disjointed and slow and hard to watch on both ends of the floor.

    • Jan 4, 20133:03 pm
      by vic

      Reply

      lol’d

    • Jan 4, 20133:10 pm
      by frankie d

      Reply

      unfortunately, the best moves that the pistons have made this year have all been forced on frank or happened by accident or process of elimination.
      first good move?  moving singler into the starting line up, a move that a player recommended.
      playing daye and CV?  only after wasting about 20 games with maggette sucking up 15-20 minutes a game. anyone could see that maggette had absolutely nothing and it should have taken frank about one quarter to recognize that fact and glue his fanny to the bench.  the fact that he wasted 18 games figuring that out is disturbing.
      putting bynum in a position to succeed?   again, an accident, as stuckey’s injury is the only thing that has allowed bynum to be put in this position.
      for the last two years, detroit’s 3 point shooting had been a problem.  despite the fact that they had a couple of guys who’d demonstrated the ability to shoot from distance – CV and daye.  did those guys have holes in their games that made it problematic to play them?  sure.  but most nba players have holes in their games and it is a coach’s job to exploit their talents and hide their defects.
      i wish frank had shown an ability to look at his roster and his line ups and come up with answers, without stumbling into them because of circumstances.  (doing something with maxiel would be a good indication of that ability.)
      to his credit, he’s rolled with some of those forced changes, but his inability to move forward to solutions, without exigent circumstances, is not a good sign. 

      • Jan 4, 20133:22 pm
        by vic

        Reply

        my sentiments exactly. 
        He’s a great system and attitude coach (and that’s a good thing for a developing team), but most of his decisions are not effective. The players are making the decisions for him, literally. 

      • Jan 4, 20133:25 pm
        by vic

        Reply

        Every time Stuckey gets injured we get a better player out of it. We just need Stuckey to get injured twice more, and when he comes back we’ll be in contention for the Eastern conference finals.

      • Jan 4, 20134:11 pm
        by Crispus

        Reply

        I think Frank deserves more credit for refurbishing Charlie V and Daye. Charlie V was unavailable last year with a bad ankle and a bad attitude. Fans hated his guts, the front office hated his contract and he probably hated himself a little bit. CV came back with a better attitude and work ethic and Frank gave rewarded him with playing time despite the loud groans of the greater Detroit area.

        Daye was awful last year and everyone was writing him off as a summer league superstar. Who gave him playing time of over beloved hustle exemplar Jonas Jerebko? Coach Frank. Give the man some props for the good things he has done. Yes we can agree we want more Drummond. Yes Maxiell and Prince are not the future. Still, the bench is playing great and building the spirit of the whole team with wins. It’s not fair to say the bad decisions are Frank’s and the good decisions belong to the universe.

        • Jan 4, 20135:26 pm
          by frankie d

          Reply

          all of the decisions are frank’s and he deserves credit or blame for them.
          i discussed the manner in which he came to his decisions and i think it is fair to argue my point: that the decisions noted, which have worked, have been imposed by external forces, not by frank sitting down and deciding what he thought was best for his roster.
          (the last good major choice frank has made in that fashion was inserting maxiell into the starting lineup last year.  maybe there has been another – can you think of one? – but i cannot recall one where frank has sat down and changed his lineup or rotation without an injury or something else moving him in that direction.  even JJ’s benching – which brought CV into the rotation – was caused, imho, because of the impact of JJ getting whacked upside the head in sacramento and becoming ineffective, as a result.)
          the other decisions, as i’ve noted, have either taken too long or have admittedly been imposed on him in some fashion.  or he’s taken way too long to make what should have been a very quick, easy decision.
          for instance, how could anyone keep sending maggette out to get abused game after game, when it was clear from the beginning that he was a shell of his former self.
          maggette should have been an emergency warm body and a contractual asset for joe d to tinker with.
          sending him out every game as a regular rotation player was just mindbogglingly dumb.
          he did the same thing with damien wilkins last year.  so this is clearly a pattern and not just a one-off type of move that can be excused.
          maybe you can bring up specific decisions that do not fit that pattern.  i just don’t know of any others.

          • Jan 5, 20132:32 pm
            by Crispus

            Maybe you’re right. I like to think Frank prioritizes locker room harmony over on the court performance sometimes. That might be sacrilege to some but losing the team could be worse.

  • Jan 4, 20133:58 pm
    by James

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    If you go to NBA.com’s +/- section for the Pistons and sort by their best line-ups Drummond is on 10 of the first 11.  It’s no shocker to everyone here but the team plays their best ball when he’s in the line-up.

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