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Rasheed Wallace another important reason to watch the NBA this season

I’m 100 percent committed to linking to any quality Rasheed Wallace content, even if it’s not Pistons related. This piece by Netw3rk for The Classical qualifies — it’s not specifically about ‘Sheed and his time with the Pistons, but it’s a great read about what makes him, even at this late stage in his career, incredibly watchable:

We watch because there is a special sort of person who can do things which society-at-large deems to be “wrong”—fighting, marijuana use, disrespect of authority figures, unwillingness to conform to social norms, not-particularly well-kept beards, and so on—and emerge from those repeated transgressions not diminished in the public eye, but with an ever more roguish, anti-heroic magnetism. The usual commentators cluck when Rasheed does the things that Rasheed repeatedly, invariably and unapologetically does—see the parenthetical clause above. But those who truly understand the transgressive thing he’s after, who dare take Rasheed Wallace to the head, find him only more appealing and inspiring to our repressed but un-extinguished inner rebelliousness with each new transgression.

5 Comments

  • Nov 15, 20129:36 am
    by John V

    Reply

    I love some good Sheed news whenever I can get it. Thanks

  • Nov 15, 201210:16 am
    by Jacob

    Reply

    Wow – that is great article. It captures perfectly why I love ‘Sheed, but I could never really put into words why.

  • Nov 15, 201210:50 am
    by RyanK

    Reply

    Far too verbose.  I hate when a writer uses too many words.  This is like a run on sentence that never ends and struggles to make a point.

  • Nov 15, 201211:35 am
    by Haan

    Reply

    Sounds like a prefabbed sermon in search of an illustration.  Rasheed’s interesting enough in his own right.

  • Nov 16, 201211:42 am
    by Crispus

    Reply

    I like this. I was always drawn to Sheed’s disregard for stuffy NBA citizenship. Sometimes I thought of him as a poet warrior protesting the galactic injustice of the way Shaq was officiated.

    My friend writes for this magazine too. He did the Why We Watch for Kirk Hinrich article among others.
     

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