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To start or not to start: Should the Pistons leave Andre Drummond on the bench for now?

I touched on this a little in last night’s game recap, but wrote at length in today’s Detroit Free Press column about whether or not Andre Drummond should open the season as Detroit’s starting center:

Drummond has also developed some chemistry with the second unit, particularly Will Bynum. Bynum loves to play at a fast pace, he’s a better and more willing passer on the break or when players are moving and cutting and Drummond is the perfect big man for Bynum with his speed and finishing ability. Throw in Jonas Jerebko, another frontcourt player who loves to run, cut hard to the basket and crash the offensive glass, and the Pistons potentially have a pretty dynamic second unit that can bring defense, fast break points and energy whenever the team needs to speed the game up.

So basically, should the Pistons put Drummond in the starting lineup even if he doesn’t significantly improve that unit (remember, he’d be playing against the opposing teams’ best players virtually all of his minutes if he starts)? Or should they leave him as a reserve, let him dominate most other teams’ second units and give the Pistons a really interesting bench unit that perhaps gives them a big advantage over opposing benches?

I’m still not sure there’s a right answer to the start/not start question. I just want to see Drummond continue to play as well as he has this preseason.

58 Comments

  • Oct 19, 201212:51 pm
    by jake

    Reply

    i say ease him in off the bench. let him gain some confidence and work on his offense a bit. people seem to forget that greg monroe didn’t start right away…

  • Oct 19, 201212:53 pm
    by labatts

    Reply

    Yeah, and Monroe looked terrible when he first came here.  I think it was something like 89% if his shots were blocked.  I agree:  Ease him in.  You make a compelling case, Patrick.

    • Oct 19, 20122:58 pm
      by tarsier

      Reply

      I doubt any player has ever had even a single game in which at least 89% of his shots were blocked (we’ll say with a min of 3 shots), much less any significant beginning of a season.

  • Oct 19, 20121:03 pm
    by David

    Reply

    I’m in no rush to see Drummond start. Hopefully there will be many years to see him do that, successfully, as a Piston. What I want this season is to see his skills, confidence, and demeanor develop. Having the spotlight and pressure of starting, combined with the competition of going against opposing starters doesn’t sound like the best way to do that with him.

    If the Pistons were a decent big man away from the competing and making a deep run in the playoffs, I’d say go for it. But next years draft is not deep, but is relatively stacked with some talented and exciting wings. I say spend this year focused on player development, possibly look for lottery/draft success for the 3rd year in a row. Spend cap space wisely in the offseason. And make a serious push next year.

    • Oct 19, 20121:04 pm
      by David

      Reply

      meant lottery/draft success for the 4th year in a row

  • Oct 19, 20121:05 pm
    by vic

    Reply

    I don’t think he should start, but I’d be mad if he didn’t get 22 or more minutes a night.

    He should spend the first 10 minutes of each game watching Jason Maxiell operates with Ben Wallace sitting beside him on the bench as his personal coach. Maybe later on in the season after hes seen most of the league, let him start if he’s earned it. 

    • Oct 19, 20121:10 pm
      by vic

      Reply

      Plus that lets Greg Monroe switch to PF over time and not just suddenly, and get some experience thru the league that way too.
      change management man, change management 

  • Oct 19, 20121:10 pm
    by Josh

    Reply

    Yes, Monroe and Knight are playing well now, happy they didn’t start the majority of their rookie season games. Oh wait…

    People act likes there’s this huge difference because he’s 19, Knight was only 20 and led the team in minutes last season. He instantly makes the starting lineup a more athletic and defensively dynamic one. Why shouldnn’t he start? Drummond and Maxiell play the same type of game, rebound, block shots, put a body on a guy. My eyes are telling me that Drummomd already does that a higher level.

    • Oct 19, 20121:14 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Knight didn’t start the season as a starter. He was forced in because Bynum, Gordon and Stuckey all had injury issues early. By the time they were healthy, Knight had become entrenched. I’m not convinced he would’ve had a worse rookie year had he been eased into the lineup and used as a third guard off the bench as the original plan was.

      Plus, Monroe and Knight played larger roles on their college teams than Drummond, so that contributed to a perception that both were more ready to play right away.

      Like I said, I’m not convinced Drummond shouldn’t start. I just don’t think it’s any kind of necessity yet as long as he’s getting productive minutes. 

      • Oct 19, 20125:58 pm
        by CNA5

        Reply

        Monroe didn’t start right away.  He came off the bench the first third of the season. 
         
        Here are 5 reasons NOT to start Drummond:
        1.  Fouls — Many young bigs struggle with foul trouble.  This is amplified by starting out the game without having a feel for what the refs are calling.  By the time it gets to the 8-10 minute mark for most substitutions, it’s usually pretty clear how the game is going to be called.
        2.  No cohesion.  The Pistons finished 21-21 last year with a starting lineup of Stuckey, Prince, Knight, Monroe, and Maxiell.  Why jeopardize that chemistry to get the team off to a decent start?
        3.  He’ll have more knowledge of Frank’s offense/defense before he has to go up directly against the other team’s best bigs.  It’s a lot easier to cherry pick favorable minutes for rookies off the bench.  When Dwight Howard or Andrew Bynum head to the bench to take a breather in the first half, it gives Drummond a chance to settle in before going up against someone who could make life difficult for him.
        4.  It gives a goal to achieve and Lawrence Frank a carrot.  There’s a stigma attached to starting.  It gives Frank a carrot to dangle and say “if you want to start, you have to rotate faster from the weak side, not bite pump fakes, and set better screens on the offensive end”.  There’s a satisfaction in earning your spot.
        5.  Knight’s development is equally as important.  While no one will mistake Maxiell for being the most cerebral player on the floor, he does some nice things.  He makes crisp basket cuts.  He catches the ball well in traffic.  He finishes well at the rim.  He sets good screens and rolls to the basket when called.  Drummond doesn’t do that as well- yet.  Would Knight be better served learning his craft with Maxiell or Drummond on the floor to start?  It’s hard to say, because I’ll elaborate more on the pros…
        Why Drummond SHOULD start:
        1.  To develop chemistry with the other cornerstones.  If Stuckey, Knight, and Monroe are part of the long term picture, Drummond needs to get familiar with them.  Practicing with them is not enough.  Being out there on the floor during critical moments is what solidifies if a team is on the same page or not.
        2.  He has a NBA body and is well conditioned.  The physical barrier of entry for Drummond (and even English and Middleton) is not there.  Nobody has to gain or lose 10 lbs.  Nobody has to get stronger.  He has tools that can help the team immediately (so does English).
        3.  His development is critical to the Pistons contending in the next 3 years.  Keeping him engaged mentally is absolutely a necessity.  If starting and playing with Stuckey, Prince, Monroe, and Knight is the ultimate way to hold Andre accountable for putting in the work and effort, by all means start him.  In some ways it’s a lot easier for Tayshaun Prince or Greg Monroe to tell him to step up than for Will Bynum.
         
        But, I agree with Patrick.  The kid needs meaningful and productive minutes to develop.  I think he’s shown enough to be considered AT LEAST the 4th big on this team, if not the 3rd.

        • Oct 20, 201211:00 am
          by Crispus

          Reply

          Good points. Definitely a decision where Frank has reasons on both sides.

  • Oct 19, 20121:14 pm
    by swish22

    Reply

    Patrick,  Looks like one of the most gifted athletes to ever step onto the court!   Would make sense to move him right into the fire with this kind of talent assuming hes doing what the coach asks him to do!!! Whether starting or not I’m looking for 20-30 minutes a night!  Growing pains will be there but I’m ready to see him NOW!  With most of the front line being non physical what a break he fell to the Pistons!!!   The light at the end of the tunnel is still hard to see but its a glimmer of something I see!
    Go Stones GO!!!!!!       

  • Oct 19, 20121:16 pm
    by vic

    Reply

    I dont doubt he’ll start soon, I just say let him earn it when the regular season starts. As soon as he gets 19 & 10 in the regular season, let it roll. He could earn it 3 games in or 30 games in, its up to him.

    Monroe earned it, Knight started because of an injury, and earned it in the regular season. 

  • Oct 19, 20121:26 pm
    by sebastian

    Reply

    Drummond should start and so should Jerebko.
    PG- Knight, T. Will, Will B.
    SG- Stuckey, Maggette, English
    SF- Jerebko, Tay, Middleton
    PF- Moose, Maxey, Charlie V.
    C- Drummon, The Ukraine 
    Move: Daye for to any team for future second round pick.

  • Oct 19, 20121:33 pm
    by RyanK

    Reply

    Don’t start him now.  He should come in to play at the same time the other team makes a big substitution through the first 5-10 games.  See how he does against them, then start bringing him earlier to face some of the best players in the league in a 6th man role…maybe force him to draw a foul or two on the other teams starters before they rest.  We’ll need to see how Monroe does at PF also…he’ll be defending guys he hasn’t come up against at 4, so there will be a learning curve on that side as well.
    Looking at this thing realistically, he’s probably going to start because of injuries at some point this season.  Whether that happens early on or down the road, he’ll need to be ready for it.  The coach isn’t likely to have an ideal situation where he can do whatever he wants…he’s probably going to be forced to make a tough decision on this.

  • Oct 19, 20121:36 pm
    by joe

    Reply

    The Pistons are not the Thunder, Lakers or Heat so we need to start Drummond. the only position Max should be battling 4, is to back up Monroe.

  • Oct 19, 20121:49 pm
    by Crispus

    Reply

    I say let Drummond collect some scalps on the second unit. It’ll be more forgiving and boost his confidence for when he has to take on the big boys. It’ll also be more fun I think if he can run the floor and be an offensive option sooner. It’s not necessary to put Andre the Giant through hard knocks right away unless a playoff spot is at stake.

    Does anybody else see the Pistons as resembling a sort of Proto-Grizzlies? The analogues aren’t perfect, but Monroe and Drummond could become our Marc and Z-Bo, Knight is Conley and Stuckey is OJ Gay. Maxiell can be Darrell Arthur I guess, Slava is Speights and I have no idea who Tony Allen is – Kim English maybe? 

  • Oct 19, 20122:10 pm
    by koz

    Reply

    I like the running, athletic 2nd unit concept you put forth here, Helps all their confidence if they can be effective as a unit when they come in. It will help Bynum to feel important that he is contributing so he will play hard and hopefully play some D while he’s out there. There’s plenty of time to build this team for a long productive future playoff contender. It’s starting to come together.

  • Oct 19, 20122:13 pm
    by matt

    Reply

    I vote for “don’t start.” He’s got a long ways to go, let’s give him some easy minutes at first. Which teams have 2nd unit big guys that can deal with his speed and power? Athleticism will be his main advantage at first and it won’t be enough against starter-level big guys.

  • Oct 19, 20122:22 pm
    by ShawnJ

    Reply

    Shouldn’t he start if he is the best player that the Pistons have at that position?  If he does excellent in preseason and has chemistry with the first unit and there is no one that is better than him on the team, then shouldn’t he start?

    Basically, he should start if he earns it.  The Pistons should be putting their five best players on the floor like Miami does, even though technically they are out of position.  For this case, of course, the Pistons would not be out of position.  If you sit a young man and he is ready and willing to start and it is clear that he is your best player it doesn’t make sense not to start him.  However, if he proves to be too raw to start (meaning he is not the clear winner in practice) and needs to watch the games to sort of protect him then that is another issue.

  • Oct 19, 20122:33 pm
    by Anthony

    Reply

    Starting or not starting. It doesn’t really matter. Look at James Harden. He comes off the bench and beasts and then finishes the games. I’d like to see Drummond come off the bench. Dominate the 2nd units of other teams. Then once he’s rolling he’ll be in the finishing 5. Honestly. Starting does not mean much. It’s all about finishing.. A closing unit of knight, stuck, jerebko or prince (depending on if we’re ahead or behind) and then moose and Drummond down low. called the sound of that.

    • Oct 19, 20123:07 pm
      by Mark

      Reply

      I never agreed with that philosphy. pts count the same in the beginning as they do at the end. And in many ways they are more important, as what you do at the beginning determines what happens the rest of the game. You have to set the tone right from the start on defense. Once you let teams get confidence that they can go in your paint whenever they want, you are f’d the rest of the game. You can’t expect a rookie to just come in off the bench and change the whole tone of every game, after Maxiell/Moose let opposing guards get to the paint at will in the 1st qtr.

      Harden comes off the bench because he sucks on defense, and Brooks wants to set the tone from the start with Thabo. Drummond is not a scorer, he is our Thabo. And its to our advantage to let him start games for us.

      • Oct 20, 201211:16 am
        by Anthony

        Reply

        you are right, but I think to start to season he should come off the bench. Also to give him time to acclimate himself to defending NBA players (5 fouls in 18mins I think, not very good!) 
        dont get me wrong, I wanna see Drummond beasting all game and starting. But I think it’ll end up like jerebko last season, where he starts, then fouls out, or gets pulled early due to fouls. 
        i think for now he’s better off getting quality minutes and staying in the game. 

  • Oct 19, 20123:00 pm
    by Mark

    Reply

    Drummond is 19 with a year of college and a 29 yr old’s body. What’s with all this need to ease him slowly? There have been 17-18 yr old skinny high school kids starting in this league. This isn’t rocket science. The Pistons are overthinking this one. Just start him. Worst that can happen is he struggles and you go back to Maxiell. 

    I really don’t understand what there is to gain by not starting him. He will help you win more, AND he gets quality PT against top talent to develop better. You don’t get better playig against scrubs.

    • Oct 19, 20124:46 pm
      by Oracle

      Reply

      He’s a 29 year old body with a 19 year old’s emotions and intelligence.  He can build confidence and figure out the speed/demands of the NBA against a bench player, and earn his way up.  Wouldn’t want him to get lose confidence and foul out in 9 minutes against the starters every game.

      • Oct 19, 20126:34 pm
        by Mark

        Reply

        yeah, I don’t see that happening. He might be playing against better competition, but he will also have better compeition around him, with Moose, Knight, Stuckkey, and Tay. He will be the 5th on the defensive gameplan of opponents in that lineup. So in manys the game will be easier for him starting, as all the attention will be drawn towards the other guys. As opposed to off the bench, him being the focal point.

        Remember Knight was only 19 with 1 yr of college when he took over last year. ppl act like Drummond came right out of high school. I don’t think he’s as immature emotionally as ppl think. idk anymore than you, just my perception. 

  • Oct 19, 20123:16 pm
    by Corey

    Reply

    Start him off easy against the backups. There’s no reason to risk the confidence blow for having to bench him if he struggles. he should come off the bench, play 20-28 minutes a game, and finish the game whenever he is playing well. He’ll be a starter before long. 

  • Oct 19, 20123:46 pm
    by HardyHar

    Reply

    I agree with what most of you are saying. Bring him in off the bench. I’m still not convinced he’s QUITE ready/mature enough to start. I can see him getting dominated a few games and having that result in taking steps back. Let Coach Frank put him in situations where we only need effort and defense and let him solidify the confidence he’s gaining. You can see it on his face at the line that he’s still not quite there. I’d must hate to see him unravel (remember when O’quinn worked him over good in summer league?). He’s been really good in the heat of the moment though, which has been great. 
     
    I do think Frank may start him in games where the other team has a big and athletic big that will expose Moose/Max. Like others said, you don’t want to let a team steamroll you early in the game. But in those situations, Dre will only need to focus on being physical and negating that player, which should keep the pressure off of him. 
     
    But given that he can’t REALLY create for himself and that the starters are not a great assist unit (aside from Moose), he is probably better rolling with Bynum and JJ in an uptempo, less organized/methodical offense where he can exploit his speed and hops.
     
    I’d bet he’s starting by the All Star break though. I’m really curious if he will continue his trend of hustle and hitting put backs. His HS tapes show a much larger array of skills, skills we’re seeing, vs what we saw at UCONN. I really think there’s a confidence issue with him that the team and coaching staff have identified and are dealing with very cautiously. As mentioned, his maturity is still in question and one season in the league will make a huge difference for this young buck. If they handle it right, Dre may be on his way to greatness.
     
    Either way though we win. Make the playoffs, great. Miss the playoffs, keep our 1st round pick plus a loaded FA market to make a real push with next season. I think this may be the last season on irrelevancy for the Pistons. 

    • Oct 19, 20124:35 pm
      by Crispus

      Reply

      He looked like Skip 2 My Lou in those high school tapes. Maybe we’ll see some fast-break behind-the-back no-look passes from Drummond next season.

  • Oct 19, 20123:48 pm
    by Brian S

    Reply

    I don’t think he needs to start right away, I am in the semi-cautious group.  Coming into camp my fear from all the talk was that he would only be getting minutes at the end of non-close games.  It appears he is locked into a rotation spot at least to start the season.  He needs to get at least 20 minutes a game.  Ideally, I’d like to see him sub in for Maxiel at around the 8 minute mark of each half and get 3 to 5 minutes with Monroe before Greg is replaced by Jerebko.  This will allow our two pillars to build chemistry while waiting for the point that Drummond is ready to ascend to the starting position. 
    If Frank can break up the 2 big man minutes to averages of around Monroe/36, Maxiel/16, Drummond/20, Jonas/24 to start the year, I think we’ll be in good shape both for production and development.
     

  • Oct 19, 20124:10 pm
    by sebastian

    Reply

    A quick tally of the responses of whether Dre Drummond should start or not start, is an endorsement of low-expectations and minimal progress for OUR beloved Pistons.
    Start Drummond!

  • Oct 19, 20124:43 pm
    by Oracle

    Reply

    I want him to earn whatever minutes he gets.  Everyone needs to settle down.  Greg Monroe didn’t start right away, he didn’t even play in the first couple games.  Good players earn minutes, and that’s what I want Drummond to do.  If he works his way into the starting lineup the hard way, the team will be much better off than if they throw him into the fire and hope it works out.  I do not expect him to start in the first game of the season.

  • Oct 19, 20125:06 pm
    by Ray

    Reply

    No one thought he’d be this ready…he has out played everyone on the team, and even head to head with other opponets he has won the match up…. But sure now make him earn it again during the season …. Sheesh! Makes sense

  • Oct 19, 20125:09 pm
    by Mateo

    Reply

    I don’t think he should start right away. I would like to see him getting 22-24 minutes per game though. Depending on match ups and what not, I would like to see this:

    Monroe: 33 minutes per
    Drummond: 23 minutes per
    Jerebko: 19 minutes per(getting a few minutes at SF as well)
    Maxiell: 15 minutes per
    Kravstov: 6minutes per

    Villenueva and Daye can stay on the bench.
     

  • Oct 19, 20126:13 pm
    by Day and Knight

    Reply

    I’m convinced that even if we lucked out and got the 1st pick we would be having Davis come off the bench too…this team makes no sense 

    • Oct 19, 20126:37 pm
      by Mark

      Reply

      I think if this was 2003 and we drafted LeBron, we would have him coming off the bench in favor of Michael Curry. lol

      The obsession with scrub veteran hustle players for the franchise is one of the great mysteries in sports. 

  • Oct 19, 20128:23 pm
    by Jack

    Reply

    Same old tired BS argument.  The pistons keep getting off to slow starts and expect Drummond and the second unit to bail them out.  That is what happened against Miami last night except the Heat got off to a great start and the Pistons were effectively out of the game by the time the second unit came in.  We need some energy in the starting unit.  I am not worried about Drummond getting into foul trouble either.  We have depth at the five if Drummond starts.  Any ways, I swear the first two fouls on Drummond were BS calls.  On one of them D Wade runs into Drummond and falls down when Dre was just standing still and he should be called on it by the league for flopping.  He should have also been t-d up last night for throwing the ball at the ref, the dude is an a-whole.  Getting back to my point, seriously what is so great about Max that he must start.  He is no Rasheed or Ben in their primes.  He is vastly undersized and usually gets dominated when he is not making the once in a blue moon highlight reel dunk.  His defense is slightly above average and he is no where near the rebounding presence and rim protector Drummond already is.  If Monroe and Drummond start last night I guaranty it would have been a competitive game at the least.  I mean seriously what is the harm in playing them together more, if not starting them together.  Atleast tell me that.

    • Oct 19, 20129:08 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      I don’t think anyone is arguing that Maxiell has to start. But letting Drummond come off the bench lets him stay out of foul trouble, lets him get confidence against worse players than he’d face against opposing teams starters and puts him with a fast, energetic group that includes Bynum, Jerebko and either English or Middleton that complement his skillset. The starting lineup doesn’t exactly excel at pushing the pace — Prince and Monroe are both more comfortable in the halfcourt. Drummond playing on the second unit means he gets to run and get easy baskets because that’s the style all of those second unit guys play.

      At any rate, if he proves to be the best player over the rest of the preseason, by all means, start him. But what’s the rush? If he’s getting 20-30 minutes, it doesn’t really matter whether he starts. 

      • Oct 19, 20129:59 pm
        by Jack

        Reply

        You point out the weakness of putting him next to the starting lineup.  But I disagree.  Both Monroe and Prince even at this age can run the floor pretty well.  Not to mention Knight and Stuckey being one of the faster back courts in the league.  Plus a front line of Monroe and Drummond would be dominant on the offensive glass getting us easy points to start the game.  That only helps his confidence as well as the teams.  He has not exactly struggled against any of the lineups thrown at him.  He did okay against Bosh. dominated Orlando, and the whole Miluwakee front line.  Gooden has always played well against the Pistons, even against Sheed.  He was the starting PF in the Cleveland ECF series the Pistons lost in 6.  I remember him frustrating Wallace on the defensive end and even getting some double doubles on him.  He played well last year after becoming the Buck’s starting C, after Bogut left and averaged a double double.  Drummond dominated him along with Dalembert, Henson, and Ersan Illousova.  Plus even if does not start PATRICK, why is Frank not utilizing Monroe and Drummond together more.  I can’t see anyone objecting to him being the first big of the bench and playing the majority of the minutes at center  You still have not given a reason why Frank is not doing that more so far.  Even if he does not start, if he is playing well, not getting into foul trouble, why not let him play 30 plus minutes.  I can see how “starting him might be risky” though I really can not, but why not have him be the first big off the bench from day 1, and play him big minutes.  Lets face it he is the Pistons best option at Center from a defensive stand point.  I still think he should start but if not, at the least he should play major minutes.  And by that I mean 30 plus MINUTOS.  Not that silly ease him along at 15 to 25, or even 25 to 30;  TRENTE PLUS MINUTOS!!!!

        • Oct 19, 201210:12 pm
          by Patrick Hayes

          Reply

          30+? Dang Jack, you gonna ground the kid into dust before he even gets started. He’s 19. He played one college season and he only played about 20 minutes per at UConn. Monroe only even played about 32 last year because he still gets tired and asks out. It’s a long season. Nothing wrong with easing him along. Give him 20-25 and if he shows he needs more, gradually take him up. I just don’t see what can be gained by throwing him out there like he’s a veteran star starter right off the bat.

          • Oct 19, 201210:19 pm
            by Jack

            I can.  The Pistons WIN MORE GAMES!!!

          • Oct 19, 201210:27 pm
            by Jack

            BTW I love this back and forth.  I feel like the sensible STEVEN A SMITH, and you are the other dude Harping on Lebron for not being able to get his teams over the hill.  Those two have the most entertaning arguments about seemingly nothing.

          • Oct 19, 201210:40 pm
            by Patrick Hayes

            Wow … I don’t know what I’m more shocked by. Being compared to Skip Bayless or someone referring to SAS as sensible.

            But seriously, I’m not advocating keeping a finished product like a Lebron James or Dwight Howard on the bench. I’m advocating taking things slow with a talented kid who still has a lot to learn. Drummond can play, but there’s no reason to rush him. The Pistons aren’t likely winning anything this year. Might as well err on the side of caution with him. I think he’ll be in the starting lineup within a month, but I’m not ready to declare the job his after a few preseason games.

          • Oct 20, 20126:03 am
            by tarsier

            Skip Bayless and Stephen A Smith. I honestly have no idea which of those guys tries to be more absurdly sensationalist by stubbornly maintaining ridiculous opinions. But they get their ratings, I suppose. And that’s all that matters. :(

    • Oct 19, 20129:10 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      If you just throw him out there in the starting lineup and he struggles against bigger and better starting caliber frontlines, you run the risk of having to bench him. Why do that? Why not wait until he’s clearly won the job to put him in the starting lineup? He’s been good this preseason. But we only see part of the picture. We have no idea what he’s done in practice. I think it’s still too early to conclude that he’s clearly won that job.

  • Oct 19, 20129:07 pm
    by HardyHar

    Reply

    I think the risk is Drummond’s confidence and risking his potential by putting him out there too early. From a talent standpoint he’s ready now. 

    • Oct 19, 20129:17 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Yeah, I agree with that. I think they just want to be 100 percent sure. If you put him out there and he struggles, then you have to send him back to the bench to regroup, you certainly risk messing with his confidence. To me, that’s a bigger risk than maybe keeping him on the bench a couple weeks longer than he should be just to be 100 percent sure he’s ready.

      • Oct 19, 20129:42 pm
        by sebastian

        Reply

        Although a valid and cogent argument, I’m not so certain that bringing Dre Drummond off the bench will protect him from getting quick fouls.
        The frequency of fouls called against Drummond can very well be greater as a non-starter, than as a starter.
        Drummond could just as well be loaded up with phantom fouls, entering games as a reliever. We all have seen, big guys come off of the bench and get typed-cast as a fouler and before you know the guy has two quick fouls on his scorecard and the guy never gets the chance to develop any groove.
        But, if Drummond starts then the Pistons must start the best small forward currently on the roster: Jerebko.
        A slow and predictable Tayshaun does not help the spacing on the floor, when Moose and Dre are on the floor, together. That is if L. Frank ever put Moose and Dre on the floor, together.
        L. Frank has really wasted opportunities to develop a better defined starting line-up and rotations, but this is a topic for another thread.
         
         

  • Oct 19, 20129:38 pm
    by Jack

    Reply

    Monroe regularly gets double teamed when with the current starting rotation.  I think it will be harder for the opposing team to double Monroe or Knight when they are on the floor with Drummond, because if Drummond’s man leaves him to go double team someone else, it will leave to easy high percentage buckets for the pistons, or Drummond drawing fouls and going to the free throw line.  Even if Drummond misses, it will allow the Pistons to get set on defense afterwards, allowing for improved defensive efficiency.

    • Oct 19, 20129:48 pm
      by sebastian

      Reply

      Jack is right. The probability of higher percentage buckets occurring with a tandem of Moose and Dre is greater, than Moose and Maxey.
      And, anther thing about the fear of Dre accumulating early fouls, the opposing front line players can get a few early fouls called against them trying to hold back the young phenom.

  • Oct 19, 201210:54 pm
    by Thomas

    Reply

    Only thing that I’m concerned with is that Knight still needs to develop better playmaking skills, and I don’t think Dre will develop well with Knight running the show right now until Knight improves his passing ability. 

  • Oct 20, 201210:40 am
    by revken

    Reply

    I’m in the “no rush to start him” group.  Frankly, I’m impressed that he’s apparently won the backup center job over Kravtsov.  If you think about that, it’s a pretty big deal, and he’s earned it.  What I’d like to see is Drummond becoming the first big off the bench, subbing for Maxiell.  That gives him some playing time alongside Monroe.  Then JJ can sub for Monroe at some point.  Hopefully as the season progresses, Drummond gets more minutes, and maybe he eventually starts.  But if by the season’s end he’s playing 24+ minutes, then it’s been a success, and he’s probably ready to start alongside Monroe next year.

  • Oct 20, 201211:05 am
    by DG

    Reply

    Developing chemistry with Will Bynum isn’t going to get the Pistons to the promised land. 

    Developing chemistry with Greg Monroe could make the Pistons frontline one of the most dominant forces in the league.  They may struggle in the beginning because there skills are so opposite.  But in the end, it could have a much higher return for the Pistons.

    That’s the reason they drafted Drummond.  His skillset compliments Monroe’s.  Let’s suck up the growing pains and develop that chemistry.  The Pistons don’t have a better option opposite Monroe.

  • Oct 20, 201211:10 am
    by DG

    Reply

    Pffftt… “their” skills are so opposite. (typo)

  • Oct 20, 20122:23 pm
    by Ray

    Reply

    START DRUMMOND! All we have said is …. Monroe is really a PF and we need a Center … Then we get a Center …and still wanna start Maxiell ….

  • Oct 20, 20123:34 pm
    by TecumsehsGhost

    Reply

    Nope. I say let him start the year off the bench, have Maxiell start early, and then gradually work Drummond into the regular starting lineup by years end. I love Drummonds game, but we shouldnt rush him.

    • Oct 20, 20124:26 pm
      by Mark

      Reply

      I don’t get this idea of gradually working him in. ppl are talking like we are a contender and can afford the luxury of slowly developing a rookie at our own pace. 

      This is professional basketball. Fans pay to see teams put their best players on the floor and win. This isn’t the D-League. No one is paying to watch players develop. We are a better team with him on the court, period. We can’t afford the luxury of bringing him along slowly when we are so bad without him. Thats why all other lotto teams start their top picks right away. Because the reason they were in the lotto is because they have a major void of talent, which the rookie was drafted to address.  

      If they wanted to bring him along slowly, they should have went and got a veteran big man who can actually help us win games. When you settle for Maxiell, who does not qualify as that, then you have no choice but to play the rookie big minutes, because you didn’t go out and get anyone better.

      We were NOT a winning team with Maxiell starting, despite the all myths out there. .500 does ot equal winning.
       

      • Oct 20, 20124:50 pm
        by Patrick Hayes

        Reply

        “ppl are talking like we are a contender and can afford the luxury of slowly developing a rookie at our own pace. ”

        There’s a reason contenders develop players at their own pace. Because it’s the smart thing to do. If the Pistons are likely to be a non-playoff team (I get that there in the convo for the 8th seed, but at this point, I’d still say it’s more unlikely than likely that they get in), why rush him? If the team is 100 percent convinced he’s ready to start and play a primary role, then go with it. If they’re not sure yet, there is absolutely nothing wrong with taking their time. Bad teams often make the mistake of rushing young players precisely because they are bad and desperate and cave to fan/media pressure. There are plenty of examples of situations like that being bad for both the player and the team in the long run.

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