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Archive → July, 2012

Dennis Rodman is now an author of a children’s book

Dennis Rodman posts write themselves these days with no extra commentary needed, so just read this for yourself:

After going through his latest divorce and having to spend time away from his children as a result, Dennis has now done something many people never thought would ever happen. He’s written a children’s book which he’s dedicating to his children, with the intent to relay a positive message to our countries youth and to his own children. Rodman is moving forward in a postive way and has recently connected with his estranged father as well. Rodman’s Agent, Darren Prince had this to say “We’re not only excited about the project but we believe it’s a step in the right direction for Dennis.” Rodman has teamed up with Author/screenwriter Dustin Warburton and illustrator Dan Monroe with the sole purpose of conveying good lessons to children based on Dennis’s own experiences as a world class athlete while overcoming obstacles as a child.

Yes, my son is definitely getting this book for his next birthday.

Hat tip, SLAM

Isiah Thomas was better than Kevin Johnson

Ethan Sherwood Strauss, Myles Brown and Bomani Jones had a discussion on Twitter last night that began with Strauss declaring Kevin Johnson was better than Isiah Thomas. What followed was Brown and Jones telling Strauss he was wrong, wrong, wrong.

Brown and Jones are correct. Isiah Thomas was better than Kevin Johnson.

Before explain why, here’s what everyone said:

The exchange

Strauss:

Kevin Johnson was better than Isiah Thomas. Had we known that, Isiah might not have been granted free reign to destroy the Knicks

Brown:

@SherwoodStrauss No.

Strauss:

@mdotbrown Yes. http://www.basketball-reference.com/players/j/johnske02.html …http://www.basketball-reference.com/players/t/thomais01.html …

Brown:

@SherwoodStrauss No. This is inarguable.

Jones:

@mdotbrown @SherwoodStrauss k.j. better than zeke? that’s cute.

Strauss:

@bomani_jones @mdotbrown KJ was better statistically. He just didn’t play on the league’s best defensive team (Also got hurt a lot)

Brown:

@SherwoodStrauss @bomani_jones He also didn’t beat Bird, Magic or Jordan in their prime. Or lead a team, much less in the manner Zeke did.

Jones:

@mdotbrown @SherwoodStrauss think about it: zeke turned his game DOWN to get the most of that roster with no other star.

Strauss:

@bomani_jones @mdotbrown The title Pistons weren’t a great offensive team & Zeke wasn’t responsible for that defense

Strauss:

@bomani_jones @mdotbrown Also, the people deeming this opinion ridiculous should at least acknowledge that the numbers don’t flatter Zeke

Brown:

@SherwoodStrauss @bomani_jones It may be childish and dismissive, but there’s few other ways to say it: Fuck yo numbers. Zeke was better.

Strauss:

@mdotbrown @bomani_jones I’d say fuck our old non-League Pass, non-Internet era (and the memories it produced)

Strauss:

@KNelsonDX @bomani_jones @mdotbrown Why’s the burden of proof on me to show that a statistically worse player is worse? It should be on you

Strauss:

NBA isn’t MLB, but the numbers have to mean SOMETHING. It’s that or our collective memories are always perfect & can’t be questioned

Jones:

@SherwoodStrauss @KNelsonDX @mdotbrown yeah, but you told us we’re just old and on some "good ol days" noise. what would you listen to?

Strauss:

@bomani_jones @KNelsonDX @mdotbrown Nah. The claim is that our old days memories suck, given those old contraints

Jones:

@SherwoodStrauss @KNelsonDX @mdotbrown except when they both played, and folks were in the present, nobody said this sh t you’re spittin.

Strauss:

@bomani_jones @KNelsonDX @mdotbrown Nobody says it because they’ll get THIS kind of response. But there’s plenty of reason to say it

Strauss:

@bomani_jones @negativedunks @mdotbrown Okay, hypothetical. Zeke never plays with a top-5 defense. How do we remember him?

Strauss:

@bomani_jones @negativedunks @mdotbrown KJ led two consecutive No. 1 offenses. Did Zeke ever do that?

Strauss:

To those asking, I’m not citing PER in this Zeke-KJ thing. Don’t need to. PER, Win Shares, Wins Produced, all the aggregate stats agree

This went on a bit longer, and you can check the various Twitters to read it in full, but I’m going to stop here.

The reasoning

PER

  • Isiah Thomas: 19.8
  • Kevin Johnson: 19.1

Win shares

  • Isiah Thomas: 12.5
  • Kevin Johnson: 9.4

Win shares per 48 minutes

  • Isiah Thomas: .143
  • Kevin Johnson: .117

Why do my numbers favor Thomas when Strauss’ numbers favor Johnson? I’m looking at the playoffs. He’s looking at the regular season.

Can’t we all agree the playoffs are more important than the regular season?

Plus, factor in that Thomas, in sum, advanced further in the playoffs than Johnson – meaning Isiah’s playoff numbers presumably came against tougher competition than Johnson’s – and Thomas blows Johnson out of the water.

Brandon Knight’s trademark maturity on display during interview at basketball camp

Wixom, Mich. — At Brandon Knight’s basketball camp on July 28, it didn’t take long to witness the maturity that has those who see him up close on a daily basis insistent that he’s going to maximize his potential.

Knight, who won’t turn 21 until December, was busy interacting with and posing for pictures with kids who in some cases were not a whole lot younger than him. Knight partnered with Pro Camps to do the camp in Michigan, and his first response to a question about why he wanted to be a part of the camp hinted at the fact that Knight is mature beyond his years, as numerous profiles of him have indicated.

“I did one at home (in Florida) and wanted to do one in Detroit as well,” Knight said. “I just want to give back to the community and give kids an opportunity that I had when I was younger to go to camp and just learn some new things. Basketball is something you can do on your own, do drills on your own, so it gives them a chance to learn some drills that they can take with them.”

He also gave a response about the nature of the camp itself sure to please basketball purists, who often complain that the teaching of fundamentals at the youth level is a lost art.

“The camps I went to (as a kid) were mostly just to play,” Knight said. “They weren’t really instructional. These type of camps (Pro Camps) are more to teach the fundamentals and drills they can go do on their own and try and get better.”

Despite the relevant statistical criticisms of Knight that are out there (namely, that he turns it over too much and doesn’t get enough assists for a starting point guard), I’m a huge believer that a player with Knight’s match of talent and work ethic is a good long-term investment for the Pistons.

Knight answered several questions on a variety of topics. Rather than trying to mash his quotes all into one story, below is a breakdown of some of the things he discussed. As you’ll see, Knight has a pesky habit of always saying the right thing, and that makes it really hard not to believe in him.

The Brandon Knight-Rodney Stuckey backcourt

The Pistons are banking on Knight improving significantly enough to be a key part of a contending team at some point in the future. They are invested in Stuckey after re-signing him to a lucrative deal last offseason. Both players have their detractors among Pistons fans, but for better or worse, this is the team’s starting backcourt for the foreseeable future. And actually, I’m pretty confident it can work.

Knight shot 37 percent from 3-point range as a rookie. He shot around that same percentage in his one college season. For the criticisms of his game as a rookie, pretty much everyone, critic or not, agrees that the most significant skill he brought to the table last season was his spot-up shooting. Next to a guard like Stuckey, who is most effective when he’s bulldozing his way into the lane and drawing contact, it’s vital that the Pistons have spot-up shooters. So if you’re committed to Stuckey as one of your starting guards, Knight does possess the main skill I would think you would look for in the other starter. In fact, shooting ability is the reason the Pistons originally viewed Ben Gordon as the ideal compliment for Stuckey, back when Stuckey was considered the team’s point guard of the future. Unlike Gordon, though, Knight is more versatile and bigger, so he shouldn’t be the long-term defensive liability Gordon proved to be.

During the season, Stuckey mentioned his plans to get to know Knight better this summer and work with him a lot. They also developed a good relationship during the season as they played together. Knight says that bond has strengthened this summer.

“This summer has been chemistry building really,” Knight said. “Just spending a lot of time around each other on and off the court, working out with one another and building bonds. As you get close to someone, you can talk to them even more on the court, relate to them more on the court. When you work an entire summer with a guy in the trenches, when it gets time for games to start, that continues.”

Joe Dumars has talked several times over the years about his belief that traditional views of basketball positions are out-dated. There is good evidence to support that — the point guard position, in particular, has changed dramatically over the last decade or so. In Knight and Stuckey, the Pistons might not have an individual starting point guard. But within their two skillsets, they probably come out of it with close to a full point guard and a full shooting guard. That versatility — having two players who can score or alternate running the offense — could prove to be an advantage for how the Pistons attack teams should they continue to work on complementing each other’s skills.

“It gives a big advantage,” Knight said. “It makes our rotation more versatile. He can play the one or the two, I can do the same thing. It adds versatility to the guard position.”

Getting a real offseason

Heading into last season, the plan for the Pistons was to rely on veteran guards while implementing the rookie Knight slowly off the bench. That plan was scrapped pretty early as injuries forced Knight into the starting lineup. The Pistons kept him as their starter the entire season and perhaps no rookie in the league was thrown to the wolves, ready or not, more than Knight. There were times he looked good. There were games he looked lost. But the Pistons remained committed to playing him regardless of his performance fluctuations because the one thing he consistently displayed was a tireless work ethic.

Amid all of the wildly different opinions on Knight last season, something I think often got lost that he deserved more credit for was simply his durability. Many rookies broke down, battled injuries and missed games during a brutal, sprint of a lockout-shortened NBA season. Knight had a larger workload than any rookie, played through pain and didn’t miss a game.

On top of that, the Pistons didn’t have a coaching staff or system in place when he was drafted and he didn’t have an offseason program to get ready. Now, he gets to build on that rapid fire learning experience as a rookie with a full offseason and a coaching staff whose expectations he knows and a system he has a year of experience in.

“It gives me a lot of not just confidence, but being comfortable,” Knight said. “With the lockout, not being able to do a (full) training camp, just learning everything on the fly, it kind of puts you in some discomfort. It added some adversity. I think our team as a whole was at a disadvantage. We had a new system, new players, new coaches and we had to get used to them. Now that we know what to expect, know our system better and know what it takes for our team to win games, I think we’ll be more prepared at the start of this season.”

Although Knight is excited for the season to start, he’s also still working to maximize what is left of the summer before training camp.

“Once I heard that it (the schedule) came out, I definitely got excited about starting the season,” he said. “We still have a little bit of offseason left. I enjoy the offseason. That’s when you get better. We have a lot of guys working hard, we added a lot of new pieces and I’m just confident in what we’re going to be able to do this year. We have a lot of guys who are hungry, and I know myself and the other guys are tired of having lackluster performances. We’re just ready to have a good season.”

Rebuilding a locker room

At their peak in the 2000s, the Pistons were known for having one of the most harmonious, drama-free locker rooms in the NBA, perhaps in all of major pro sports. It’s also one of the many things that has withered away with the team’s decline.

Veteran players grew mistrustful of management after the Chauncey Billups trade. They publicly belittled the coach. They mutinied. There were rumors of a locker room divide between veteran players and young players. In the past year, the front office has worked to heal those wounds, and Knight’s, Greg Monroe‘s and Jonas Jerebko‘s presences as hard-working, humble young players have played a big part in improved chemistry behind the scenes and earning the respect of veteran teammates.

Knight noted that the infusion of youth on the roster should help make practices even more competitive, specifically that young players need to prove and establish themselves as NBA players and are possibly fighting for roster spots in some cases while veterans are already established.

“Last year I had those type of (younger) guys around me, it’s just I didn’t know Greg as well, didn’t know Vernon Macklin as well,” Knight said. “I didn’t know a lot of the older players. Just overall, having a year to know and relate to guys better and having more guys around your age will make practices a little more competitive, a little more athletic, with guys not really having an excuse to not get after it. Younger guys have more of a sense of, ‘I have to get in practice to prove myself.’ Older guys work hard, but they don’t need to make a name for themselves in practice. Having younger guys definitely will help us get better, but for me, I’m gonna be comfortable with all the guys there.”

The Pistons of the 2000s peak were famous for having an edge, for bonding over a collective experience that other teams gave up on them or deemed them expendable. They rallied around that shared NBA experience and used it as motivation. This new Pistons core, though much younger, could regardless share that attitude.

Monroe fell further than expected in the 2010 draft. Knight fell further than expected in 2011. Andre Drummond fell further than expected in 2012. Hopefully, it creates a similar rallying point.

“It motivates you,” Knight said. “As soon as you come out of college, it’s something that you use and you always look back on for motivation. For me and Greg and even Andre, our biggest thing is we want to change the culture here in Detroit. That’s our main thing. Every time me and Greg come in the locker room, we don’t want to lose. We hate losing. We want to get Detroit back to where it was. It will take a lot of hard work. They had a lot of great teams, a lot of great players in the past, but we’re working really hard just to get back and achieve even more than that.”

Rationality vs. Hope

Last season, I wrote a post called, ‘Don’t ruin Brandon Knight by looking too closely at his stats right now.’ I’m doubling down on that. I’m not going to predict that Knight is destined for stardom. In fact, if he doesn’t become anything more than a reliable rotation player in his career, he’s still worth having around. It’s good to have guys on your roster who push themselves. It’s good to have guys who are mature. It’s good to have guys who desperately want to win. It’s good to have guys who want to be in Detroit, who want to be involved in the community. It’s good to have guys who can make 3-pointers. Knight has talent and upside, and his work ethic, if he’s persistent with it, makes it a safe bet that he’ll overcome some of the mistakes he makes on the court as a young player. Knight’s qualities make him easy to root for. I’m not particularly worried about trying to predict how good he’ll be in the future. I like him and like that he’s on the team that I follow, and that’s sufficient for me at this stage in his development. There have been a handful of guys on the Pistons in the last few seasons who haven’t been particularly fun to follow or root for, so don’t discount how nice it is having a guy like Knight around, working as hard as he possibly can to get better.

Oh, and just to drive home the point that the guy knows how to give a quote that will endear him to fans, coaches and team officials alike, with the Olympics going, Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press asked Knight if he ever dreamed of getting to that level someday where he’d be considered for inclusion on the U.S. team. Knight’s response:

“I’m focused on the Pistons being an elite team. That’s my goal as an individual player and one of the leaders of this team.”

LeBron James comes up with an on-the-fly Jonas Jerebko scouting report

Probably one of the more difficult aspects of being an international superstar, sports or otherwise, is always having to be on the ready for out-of-left-field questions from international members of the media. Case in point: LeBron James, in London preparing to play in the Olympics, fielded a question about … Jonas Jerebko?

Brian Manzullo of the Detroit Free Press has the funny exchange:

‘Jerebko? Do you want me to talk about Jerebko?”

That’s what LeBron James asked a Swedish reporter when he surfaced a question about Pistons forward Jonas Jerebko, the lone Swedish player in the NBA.

James had glowing things to say about the Swedish national team member.

“Jerebko’s a good player. No, I mean, he’s a really good player. He’s doing so much for his team,” James said. “He can play at different positions, he’s good at rebounds, he’s good in defense.

“He’s already a shining star in Detroit. And he is just going to get better and better.”

Honestly, that’s a pretty good overall synopsis of Jerebko, when Jerebko is probably among the last topics you’re expecting to be asked about in an Olympic media scrum. ‘Shining star’ might be a little generous, but hey, that’s a great compliment for Jerebko.

Nick Willis: Detroit Pistons’ representative in the 2012 London Olympics

Nick Willis called me earlier this week from Italy.

“I’m only about 70 minutes from where Kobe was born,” said Willis, who was spending a few days in Spoleto.

Kobe Bryant was born in Philadelphia, though he grew up in Rieti, Italy, but that’s not what struck me about Willis’ description. What struck me was that Willis could have described his location in infinite ways (or not at all), but he chose to characterize it by its proximity to Kobe’s onetime home.

Nick Willis is basketball crazy. More importantly, he’s Pistons crazy.

Most importantly, he’s an Olympian.

Willis will represent New Zealand at the 2012 London Olympics in the 1,500-meter run, the same event where he earned a silver medal in the 2008 Beijing games. Willis, to me, will also represent the Detroit Pistons in these Olympics.

Willis came to the University of Michigan in 2003, just as the Pistons were entering a string of several successful years, including the 2004 NBA championship. Though he grew up an Allen Iverson fan in New Zealand, Willis became hooked on the Pistons after attending a game at The Palace.

“I was just really pumped to go to an NBA game, finally,” Willis said. “I always dreamed of being able to do that.”

The atmosphere at The Palace coupled with the urging of Michigan teammate Joe Shramski turned Willis into a Pistons fan and gave him a way to bond with his Ann Arbor friends. Yet, while rooting for a prime example of successful teamwork, Willis appreciated the Pistons’ elite individual skills most.

Willis, who grew up playing rugby and basketball, said he struggled with the “politics” of those team sports.

“When I’m in an individual sport, I control my own destiny to a degree,” Willis said.

So, one world-class athlete became drawn to other world-class athletes – especially Chauncey Billups. Willis even jokingly told his wife that their first child would be named Chauncey.

Wills was especially fascinated with Billups’ mental approach.

“He really just truly felt that he controlled the game and wasn’t intimidated by anyone,” Willis said.

In a sport like running, where mentality is so key, Willis tried to emulate Billups when he faced challenging fields.

Like many Pistons fan, though, Willis felt the team needed a change by 2009. So, when Detroit traded Billups for Iverson, his childhood favorite, Willis was all for it. As Willis and I discuss the Pistons – their ill-fated foray into 2009 free agency, their promising core, their 2012-13 outlook – it occurs to me how much Willis sounds like just another fan.

But he’s far from it. Willis is an Olympian, one of the elite athletes in the world, and he can relate to professional basketball players in ways we can’t.

Willis and Ben Gordon, getting to know each other at the Pistons open practice before last season, discussed meeting up in Olympic Village. But Gordon won’t play for Great Britain, and he isn’t a Piston anymore. anyway. The Pistons’ other Olympic hopefuls, Charlie Villanueva and Greg Monroe, didn’t make it to London, either.

That leaves Willis without any Pistons to find at the games, but obviously there will be plenty of NBA players around. When we spoke, Willis assured me that he views professional basketball players as just people, no different than anyone else. And then I look at Willis’ Twitter today (@nickwillis):

Just saw NBA stars Manu Ginobli, Tony Parker, Ronnie Teriouf in the dining hall. Should have brought my cards to get signed!

Through Twitter, Willis has hit on all the right notes of joy and savoring the experience that we hope to see in our Olympians. If his Pistons ties alone didn’t convince you to root for him, his Twitter might. A sampling:

Want to give a huge thanks to NZ tax payers for the support you have given through Sparc funding these past 8 years @nzolympics

Sometimes wonder how tax dollars spent on me is a good investment, but I truly hope to return the favor by inspiring the nation.

Absolutely honoured to be named flag bearer for New Zealand at the#london2012 Opening Ceremonies.

Was asked in March, and couldn’t even tell my Dad until tonight.

And of course:

No matter how much running is going on, I never forget about my @detroitpistons though!

Even when we talked about Willis’ running, everything came back to the Pistons. Willis’ racing season begins in July, and next year, he wants a better way to occupy his time beforehand.

“There’s nothing late-May and early-June basketball on TV, in my opinion, “But without the Pistons there, its not really that exciting.”

I’ll echo those sentiments. There’s nothing like the Olympics. But without any Pistons there, it’s not quite as exciting.

Thankfully, the Pistons are represented this year.

Greg Monroe bolsters faux alternate U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team

Bradford Doolittle of Basketball Prospectus crunched the numbers and found a team of Americans that, when healthy, would approximately equal the actual U.S. Olympic men’s basketball team. Obviously, Greg Monroe made that alternate team:

A codicil to that is the glaring omission of Greg Monroe, especially given the glut of injuries to American big men. Bynum would be a no-brainer, but he opted to sit out international competition. That was probably a wise choice given his history of knee trouble. However, Monroe was willing and able to compete but didn’t even land a spot on the Select Team. Meanwhile, rookie Anthony Davis is on Team USA without having logged a single NBA minute. Being that Monroe already projects as one of the rising stars in the NBA and he’s voiced displeasure for his Team USA snub, this may turn out to be a good omen for Pistons fans. He’ll be on a mission.

Pistons and playoffs? The pluses and minuses to that scenario playing out

In this week’s column for the Detroit Free Press, I had a back and forth argument with myself about whether or not the Pistons would be best served long-term by making the playoffs this season. Rationally speaking, the Pistons playing competitive basketball and coming up just short of the playoffs might be the best scenario — they compete for a spot without actually getting it, keep their draft pick (if they make the playoffs, their pick goes to Charlotte), add another lottery talent and head into next offseason with another young asset as a result of that pick plus significant cap space.

But here’s my less rational argument, the part of me that wants to see them get in even if it means they are first round fodder for the Heat:

The Pistons, along with the Celtics, Lakers, Spurs and Bulls, are arguably the flagship franchises of the modern NBA. Each of those teams has been through downturns at different points since the 1980s, and the Pistons are no different. But they’re on a current three-year streak of not making the playoffs, tying their early 1990s mark of futility. Since 1980, the Spurs have not gone more than one consecutive season without making the playoffs. Same for the Lakers. The Celtics had an ugly six-year stretch in the Rick Pitino/M.L. Carr era in the late 1990s and it also took the Bulls six years to recover from Jerry Krause’s desire to replace Michael Jordan with Brent Barry after the 1998 season, but no one wants to see the Pistons go on that kind of streak. If the Eastern Conference is weak enough to get into the playoffs now, even if it means losing an opportunity to add another promising young player to the mix, better to do it and not let that playoff-less streak keep growing into a monster.

Pistons to face Knicks in international game (update: in London)

The Pistons’ 2012-13 schedule includes a Jan. 17 international game against the Knicks. Both teams have at least three days off before and after the game, so that leaves enough time to get practically anywhere in the world. Where would you like to see the Pistons play?

On the downside, it counts as a Detroit home game, so The Palace will host just 40 games this season.

Update: in London

Stefan Bondy of the New York Daily News:

Lin and the Rockets will visit the Knicks on Dec. 17 and a month later, the Knicks will take on the Pistons in London.

MVP Ultimate Basketball (a British site):

The New York Knicks are set to play the Detroit Pistons in London in a regular season game at The 02 Arena, league sources have told MVP.

Detroit Pistons 2012-13 schedule

DAY

DATE

OPPONENT

TIME

Wed.

31-Oct-12

Houston

7:30

Fri.

2-Nov-12

at Phoenix

10:00

Sun.

4-Nov-12

at L.A. Lakers

9:30

Tue.

6-Nov-12

at Denver

9:00

Wed.

7-Nov-12

at Sacramento

10:00

Fri.

9-Nov-12

at Oklahoma City

8:00

Sat.

10-Nov-12

at Houston

8:00

Mon.

12-Nov-12

Oklahoma City

7:30

Wed.

14-Nov-12

at Philadelphia

7:00

Fri.

16-Nov-12

Orlando

7:00

Sun.

18-Nov-12

Boston

7:30

Wed.

21-Nov-12

at Orlando

7:00

Fri.

23-Nov-12

Toronto

7:30

Sun.

25-Nov-12

at New York

1:00

Mon.

26-Nov-12

Portland

7:30

Wed.

28-Nov-12

Phoenix

7:30

Fri.

30-Nov-12

at Memphis

8:00

Sat.

1-Dec-12

at Dallas

9:00

Mon.

3-Dec-12

Cleveland

7:30

Wed.

5-Dec-12

Golden State

7:30

Fri.

7-Dec-12

Chicago

7:30

Sat.

8-Dec-12

at Cleveland

7:30

Mon.

10-Dec-12

at Philadelphia

7:00

Tue.

11-Dec-12

Denver

7:30

Fri.

14-Dec-12

at Brooklyn

7:30

Sat.

15-Dec-12

Indiana

7:30

Mon.

17-Dec-12

L.A. Clippers

7:30

Wed.

19-Dec-12

at Toronto

7:00

Fri.

21-Dec-12

Washington

7:30

Sat.

22-Dec-12

at Washington

7:00

Wed.

26-Dec-12

at Atlanta

7:30

Fri.

28-Dec-12

Miami

7:30

Sun.

30-Dec-12

Milwaukee

7:30

Tue.

1-Jan-13

Sacramento

7:30

Fri.

4-Jan-13

Atlanta

7:30

Sun.

6-Jan-13

Charlotte

7:30

Fri.

11-Jan-13

at Milwaukee

8:30

Sat.

12-Jan-13

Utah

7:30

Thu.

17-Jan-13

New York

TBD

Sun.

20-Jan-13

Boston

7:30

Tue.

22-Jan-13

Orlando

7:30

Wed.

23-Jan-13

at Chicago

8:00

Fri.

25-Jan-13

at Miami

7:30

Sun.

27-Jan-13

at Orlando

6:00

Tue.

29-Jan-13

Milwaukee

7:30

Wed.

30-Jan-13

at Indiana

7:00

Fri.

1-Feb-13

Cleveland

7:30

Sun.

3-Feb-13

L.A. Lakers

1:00

Mon.

4-Feb-13

at New York

7:30

Wed.

6-Feb-13

Brooklyn

7:30

Fri.

8-Feb-13

San Antonio

7:30

Sat.

9-Feb-13

at Milwaukee

8:30

Mon.

11-Feb-13

New Orleans

7:30

Wed.

13-Feb-13

Washington

7:30

Tue.

19-Feb-13

Memphis

7:30

Wed.

20-Feb-13

at Charlotte

7:00

Fri.

22-Feb-13

at Indiana

7:00

Sat.

23-Feb-13

Indiana

7:30

Mon.

25-Feb-13

Atlanta

7:30

Wed.

27-Feb-13

at Washington

8:00

Fri.

1-Mar-13

at New Orleans

8:00

Sun.

3-Mar-13

at San Antonio

7:00

Wed.

6-Mar-13

New York

7:30

Fri.

8-Mar-13

Dallas

7:30

Sun.

10-Mar-13

at L.A. Clippers

9:30

Mon.

11-Mar-13

at Utah

9:00

Wed.

13-Mar-13

at Golden State

10:30

Sat.

16-Mar-13

at Portland

10:00

Mon.

18-Mar-13

Brooklyn

7:30

Fri.

22-Mar-13

at Miami

7:30

Sat.

23-Mar-13

at Charlotte

7:00

Tue.

26-Mar-13

Minnesota

7:30

Fri.

29-Mar-13

Toronto

7:30

Sun.

31-Mar-13

at Chicago

7:00

Mon.

1-Apr-13

at Toronto

7:00

Wed.

3-Apr-13

at Boston

7:30

Sat.

6-Apr-13

at Minnesota

8:00

Sun.

7-Apr-13

Chicago

7:30

Wed.

10-Apr-13

at Cleveland

7:00

Fri.

12-Apr-13

Charlotte

7:30

Mon.

15-Apr-13

Philadelphia

7:30

Wed.

17-Apr-13

at Brooklyn

8:00

Pistons’ front-office shuffle

When Scott Perry left the Detroit Pistons for the Orlando Magic and George David replaced Perry as Joe Dumars’ No. 2, I wondered whether the Pistons would make an outside hire to keep their front office at the current staffing number. Well…

Keith Langlois of Pistons.com:

David won’t relinquish all of his domain as personnel director. He’ll still be heavily involved in the scouting of both American college players and international pros and amateurs. “George is too good at it to take him out of it completely,” Dumars said.

Doug Ash, personnel director, will assume greater responsibilities to take some of the scouting onus off of David.

“Doug will be able to assist in a lot of ways – and he already has been doing that,” David said. Ash helps coordinate the scouting schedule of not only David and Ash but scouts Durand Walker and Harold Ellis. They also make certain to make the best use of Dumars’ time, getting him to see the top prospects in the right settings.

The shuffling triggered a promotion for Ryan Hoover, who moves to the front office from his prior role as director of player development – essentially, making sure the transition of young players to professional basketball goes off smoothly.

And the Pistons’ new director of player of development will be?