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Poll: Which player belongs No. 9 on the Pistons’ draft board?

Read this before voting

1. Anthony Davis

2. Thomas Robinson

3. Michael Kidd-Gilchrist

4. Andre Drummond

5. Harrison Barnes

6. Bradley Beal

7. Meyers Leonard

8. John Henson

13 Comments

  • Jun 23, 20127:07 pm
    by 1298ty

    Reply

    I’d take PJ3 over Zeller any day of any week of any year. Guaranteed to be a better pro.

    • Jun 23, 20128:46 pm
      by TheDude

      Reply

      agreed

    • Jun 24, 20125:25 am
      by oats

      Reply

      This is hardly a guarantee. Perry Jones is a huge gamble. He’s a bit of a tweener, he never produced in college, he was very inconsistent, had attitude/motor concerns, and he didn’t get better from year one to year two. In order to be a guarantee, his floor would have to be higher than Zeller’s ceiling. That just isn’t the case. Zeller could be a solid starter while PJ3 is struggling to stick in a rotation because he just can’t seem to put it all together. I think Jones is going to be the better player, and I would say his ceiling is much higher than Zeller’s. I just wouldn’t guarantee anything when it comes to Jones.

      • Jun 24, 20129:31 am
        by tarsier

        Reply

        Absolutely agreed. I would easily take PJIII over Zeller. But that is because of the potential for a Jones pick to be huge, not any guarantees in that regard. At 9, the only way you can get a superstar is if he also has major bust potential.

  • Jun 23, 201210:42 pm
    by DoctorDaveT

    Reply

    Question: Are PJ3 and Zeller on the same tier? If so, then you have to go with Zeller. If PJ3 is on a higher tier, then OK.

  • Jun 23, 201211:20 pm
    by Bryan

    Reply

    None of us actually knows who will turn out to be the better pros amongst any of these players.  That said, it seems to me that Sullinger with his inability to play well vs quality big men, below the rim style and health issues would drop him past guys like Zeller, PJIII, and Moultrie who play the same position and in my book, even guys like rivers, lamb and lillard who play other positions.  If you support drafting Sullinger, why?

    • Jun 24, 20126:38 am
      by oats

      Reply

      First of all, why are we so certain he can’t play vs. quality bigs? That is based on him having a few bad games when defended by some decent big men. The thing is, the sample size for that claim is absolutely terrible. He rarely was defended by someone much taller than him, and whenever the height difference wasn’t significant Sullinger played quite well. In fact, he had some good games while defended by taller big men, but those are also being thrown out because those guys aren’t being considered good enough. This could all just be a case of attempting to apply a narrative explanation to what might be statistical noise due to small sample size. Let’s take a look at some of the big men with similar physical tools to Sullinger. There are several big men with similar skills, size, and athleticism that don’t have problems scoring in the NBA. Sully’s game has a lot in common with guys like Elton Brand, Carlos Boozer, and Kevin Love. While healthy, those guys have had solid careers. There are several examples of less prolific players that also compare to Sullinger, but the point still stands that there is room for a guy like Sullinger to thrive. What’s more, if teams have to switch their best defender onto Sullinger, that takes that guy off Monroe. Other than OKC there just aren’t many teams with multiple big men that fit the profile of what supposedly challenges Sullinger. It then becomes a case of pick your poison, and I rather like the sound of that. Considering that, his supposed limitation doesn’t sound all that bad.
       
      The below the rim thing isn’t all that concerning really. What we are talking about is how he’ll struggle defensively next to Monroe, and that is a mostly legitimate concern. The thing is, even as a short and not terribly athletic PF, Sullinger could be a decent defensive player. He has the bulk and the strength to become a solid on ball defender in the post. That is something the Pistons desperately need. Monroe has often been overpowered by big centers, and that led to easy points. Sullinger is more capable of standing up to them, and forcing them to shoot over him. Yeah, they will be able to shoot over him pretty easily, but that is still much better than uncontested layups and dunks. His strength will also make it harder for bigs to establish such good position against the Pistons. In short, while not an ideal fit, he could make the defense quite a bit better.
       
      Also in favor of Sullinger is what the holes in the front line of the Pistons actually are. The big men play poor defense, they don’t rebound that well other than Monroe, and they are also one of the lowest scoring front lines in the league. Sullinger is great on the boards, and rebounding translates well to the next level. Sully is also a really good offensive player, and he will go a long ways to helping Detroit’s offensive ineptitude. He scores in the paint and has range out to the 3 point line. That range will help open things up for the team, and it should make it a little easier for everyone else to get their points too. If Monroe’s offense keeps getting better, and Sully is as productive as his college career suggests, then Detroit will have one of the best offensive front lines in the league. It’d be nice for the front line not to be over matched on both sides of the ball for a change.
       
      Now we’re down to the medical red flags. Some doctor for some NBA team reportedly has red flagged Sullinger’s back at the combine. This report came right at the time teams are actively trying to mislead everyone about what their plans are. Someone with a motive to lie made a statement and didn’t back it up with any evidence. Given that the source isn’t exactly credible, it actually makes more sense to just dismiss it and base our rankings on the actual evidence that we have access to. After all, if we are wrong and the back is a real concern, the team will just dismiss him and move on to the next player on their draft board. So for the purposes of this exercise, it actually makes more sense for that report to not be factored into our decision making process. At least that’s how I see it. When we look at what’s left, we have one of the most productive players in the college game for two years running and a player who fills some serious needs for the team.

      • Jun 24, 20129:48 am
        by Pistons87

        Reply

        Great analysis. BTW, the narrative explaination for his struggles against length is very likely. Statistically these same struggles occur with most of the other big men prospects but because this is the narrative about him the media and media scouts focus on it gets constantly mentioned.

      • Jun 24, 20129:54 am
        by Bryan

        Reply

        Thanks for the insight.  I sure hope whoever the Pistons draft this year is good.  They are still a few pieces away from being good in my opinion and this draft would be huge for them.

  • Jun 24, 20121:02 am
    by Jason

    Reply

    Surprised at the lack of love for Kendall Marshall. TRUE PG, averaging almost 10 assists per game last year. This kid will be a premiere PG in this league and i’d love to see him in a Pistons uniform.

    • Jun 24, 201210:50 am
      by 1298ty

      Reply

      I’d definitely take him over the third tier big men (Moultrie, Zeller, Leonard)

      • Jun 24, 20123:03 pm
        by Jason

        Reply

        Exactly. And who knows, some of those 3rd tier bigs may end up being solid NBA players. I just think that Marshall is ready to contribute to a team now and would be a hell of a pickup.

  • Jun 24, 201212:26 pm
    by Mark

    Reply

    I love the idea/upside of Perry Jones but he has shown that he has nothing in terms of a low post game.  I’d be happy with an awkward jump hook.  But he doesn’t want to be in the post.  He like to dribble outside and drive/shoot jumpshots.  He has talked about how he would like the chance to play the 3 in the NBA.  He is 6 ft 11 235.  I hope the Pistons stay away.  Besides, this sounds a lot like a guy that we already have on our roster.  Some guy named Charlie Villanueva

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