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Pistons picked up Austin Daye’s fourth-year option in June – June!

First-round picks have two guaranteed years on their contracts followed by two team options. The options must be picked up in advance of the season before the option year (e.g., the Pistons picked up Austin Daye’s option for the 2010-11 season in October 2009). Mark Deeks of ShamSports.com:

Due to the lockout, the usual October 31st deadline for these options was put back to January 25th. So there’s still time.

[NB: Despite no customary press release saying so, Detroit did in fact exercise their options for Greg Monroe and Austin Daye back in June.]

What the what?

Any argument that Daye needs minutes this season to show the Pistons what he can do before they decide on his option is irrelevant, or at least on hold. Daye is guaranteed $2,958,077 next season, regardless.

Why pick up that option in June when the Pistons had until Jan. 25? Maybe they were concerned the lockout, set to begin July 1, would vanquish their window for picking up the option. After all, several other teams uncustomarily picked up options on their players in June.

If that were Detroit’s logic, I would have defended it. At the time, I think Daye had shown enough to deserve a fourth year. But did the Pistons have an idea they’d have part of this season to evaluate Daye? And if so, why not use it?

I don’t have a clue on these questions, because I haven’t seen the Pistons – either directly or through the media – inform fans about Joe Dumars’ rationale for picking up Daye’s option. The transaction has hardly even been mentioned. Vincent Goodwill of The Detroit wrote (incorrectly) that the Pistons picked up Daye’s option for next season before last season during his recent chat and mentioned it in passing in another article, but otherwise, I’ve seen nothing.

The lockout has created a whole new set of rules to learn on the fly. Until Tim Donahue of Eight Points, Nine Seconds informed me yesterday, I didn’t know the deadline for these options was Jan. 25 this season. I’m certainly not blaming the beat writers for missing this story.

I’m also not necessarily blaming Dumars. If the choice were still open Jan. 25, I would’ve picked up Daye’s option. He has enough ability that I’d spend $3 million for another year of hoping he sorts out his confidence and physicality issues. The Pistons – with access to Daye’s practices and other behind-the-scenes events – have more information than I do to make that decision.

But whether due to negligence or unforeseeable circumstances , the Pistons never gave themselves that option. I’d like to know why.

Update: Vince Ellis responds

Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press responded in the comments:

Hi guys,

I will tell you guys a story from my first year on the beat. I can’t remember the player (Stuckey, Afflalo), but I was in near panic near the Oct. 30 deadline because I didn’t see anything in the archives saying the Pistons had picked up the player option. Then I calmed down when a source told me they did back over the summer.

Although I would prefer a release, when these deadlines come up from players’ rookie deals it’s not really news unless the team declines to pick up the option – basically giving up on the player. Hence you see articles when the DaJuan Summers and Terrico Whites of the world are dropped. I understand the confusion. Especially when I saw bloggers writing earlier this year that the Pistons had a decision to make that I already knew they had made back in June. It’s led to some inconsistent reporting. We report Stuckey, Summers and Jerebko last June, but no mention of Daye and Monroe. In my case at least, I know I was focused on the labor negotiations, coaching search and the draft during June so maybe that’s why Monroe and Daye slipped through the cracks. All we had to do was ask.

44 Comments

  • Mar 1, 20122:19 pm
    by Alan

    Reply

    A team will (almost) always pickup the option.  Oden has his picked up.  Darko too.  Why wouldn’t you pickup the option?

    • Mar 1, 20122:28 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      To me, I don’t think it’s weird at all that they picked it up. It’s strange that they picked it up and seemingly never announced it.

      • Mar 1, 20122:48 pm
        by Alan

        Reply

        Ahhh, I see.  And I agree.  A simple Press Release “Pistons pickup option on Austin Daye” is in order.  I suppose a change in ownership or the mass firings or perhaps the untimely death of Matt Dobek may explain the failure to properly announce this action.

      • Mar 1, 20123:32 pm
        by Marvin Jones

        Reply

        Picky, picky, picky, much ado about nothing

  • Mar 1, 20122:29 pm
    by frankie d

    Reply

    more buffoonery.
    my take is different from dan’s.
    if they did pick up the option for daye, why waste a player you’ve invested in?
    just because he’s under contract for another year, that is no excuse for not properly evaluating him in order to determine what you are going to do with him.
    do you want to trade him?  keep him?  continue paying several million dollars to sit on the bench?
    pure buffoonery to pick up the option, and bury him.
    as a side note, just another example of the incompetent detroit sports media.  
    it is not the most important piece of news, but it is surely material information about the pistons franchise that they would pick up the option on one of their most recent first round draft choices.
    the fact that there is so much confusion about such a simple and basic transaction is amazing.

  • Mar 1, 20122:40 pm
    by brgulker

    Reply

    But whether due to negligence or unforeseeable circumstances , the Pistons never gave themselves that option. I’d like to know why.

    JDIAFI. 

    That’s hyperbolic, but also not far off. Dumars has lost whatever it was that he had. Example after example after example.

  • Mar 1, 20122:44 pm
    by frankie d

    Reply

    here in portland, that january 25th date was treated like the countdown for the arrival of aliens.
    nickolas batum faced that deadline and negotiations concerning his option deadline was news for weeks. 
    i hardly ever read the local beat writers – imho, they are uniformly bad, except for the guys at mlive – so didn’t have any info about issues related to daye’s situation.  i’d simply assumed that if something was happening, news would seep over here, or i’d read about it on espn.  
    just another example of how poorly served detroit sports fans are, and how much control joe d exercises over the local media.  joe obviously didn’t care if the public knew about the situation – and he may have reasons to keep the public in the dark – so he just didn’t try to get the information out.  and god knows “reporters” can’t be bothered to find out basic stuff like that.   if anyone pays attention to the detroit sports media, they know that most act as a PR adjunct to the pistons. 
    (pistonpowered excluded, as the “dumars week” series of postings was THE most comprehensive discussion of the pistons and dumars that i’ve read in the detroit media.  kudos…)

  • Mar 1, 20122:46 pm
    by neutes

    Reply

    What’s the big deal? He’s an asset. You don’t let assets leave for nothing. And maybe by some miracle he is actually good next year and we can tra…nevermind.

    • Mar 1, 20127:49 pm
      by apa8ren9

      Reply

      LOL, that remark was just too funny.

  • Mar 1, 20123:05 pm
    by frankie d

    Reply

    it has been pretty clear that joe d hasn’t really been very astute about contract and salary cap issues.  he seems to be one of the old school gms who is going to have to be dragged into the new way of the nba.  the daye contract option thing is one example of that.
    i followed the like to sham sports and came across this earlier discussion of detroit and ben wallace’s signing, and it is just further proof that joe d just doesn’t know what the heck he is doing. 
    it is plain incompetence.  pure and simple.  here is part of the post.  it is dated, obviously, but it still sheds light on a puzzling action by dumars, and gives a clue as to why he keeps doing things that seemingly don’t make any sense.  it seems as though he just doesn’t understand some of the basics.  here’s the excerpt:

    Only two teams this summer have used their Bi-Annual Exceptions so far. Milwaukee used theirs on ShamSports.com favourite Keyon Dooling, while Detroit used theirs to re-sign Ben Wallace (whose lack of effort during his time with the Bulls has permanently sullied any affection I once had for him). However, while Milwaukee used their BAE because they’d spent their MLE on Drew Gooden, Detroit used their BAE while their MLE sits there untouched. That MLE is probably going to stay untouched all summer, because they’ve certainly shown no inclination to use it thus far, and all the MLE calibre free agents have gone. They could have used it on Wallace so that they could carry over their BAE; they should have used it on Wallace so that they could carry over their BAE. But they didn’t.As was the case with Washington, this might turn out to be completely insignificant. But what if it isn’t? What was the point of that?

    Detroit didn’t have any cap space this year, instead choosing to spend their money re-signing their own team. As such, whereas they could have potentially used the BAE on someone, they couldn’t, because they had unnecessarily used it the year before. It is not a deal breaker or a particularly big deal, but it is a misappropriation of assets for a team with scant few.It’s also happened again.

  • Mar 1, 20123:29 pm
    by Patrick Hayes

    Reply

    OK, this might be petty of me, but whatevs. Goodwill just wrote this on Twitter:

    I’ve written and said more than once the Pistons picked up Austin’s option for next season before this past season…never been “incorrect”

    OK … this is from the chat yesterday that Dan was referencing in his post when he said “incorrectly:”

    His (Daye’s) option for next season was picked up before last season started, Jeff. The next deadline for him is Oct., if both sides want to negotiate an extension (unlikely at this point)

    Sorry, but I interpret that as incorrect too. According to Deeks’ report, Daye’s option for next season was picked up in June, right? So someone has to be incorrect here, and I trust Deeks/Sham Sports on salary matters over just about anyone.

    • Mar 1, 20123:40 pm
      by frankie d

      Reply

      not surprisingly, goodwill seems to have lack a basic grasp of basic english.

    • Mar 1, 20123:52 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      I don’t really blame him much for not having the news. If the team never told the media about it or even put a news release on their website, it’s something that could easily slip the minds of reporters to ask about, especially during a lockout with no contact.

      But clearly, he got it wrong in his chat, then insisted he didn’t get it wrong, which is annoying.

  • Mar 1, 20124:09 pm
    by frankie d

    Reply

    well, i guess i’m not so forgiving.
    the contractual status of players is basic information about a team a beat writer covers.
    it is basic information that beat writers should, first, now about, and second, report to the public, and last, report accurately.
    instead of writing stories about gladys knight or the latest arnie kander fluff piece, how about some basic information about the contractual status of players?  
    that is why i rarely read the  daily websites.  
    and it is such a contrast to what goes on in pdx, where basic info like that is reported, perhaps in too breathless a fashion.  but at least nothing of this sort ever happens. 
    and it just confirms what i’ve always thought and said: that nothing really gets reported unless joe wants it to get out.  obviously joe didn’t think it was a priority to get the info out.
    “reporting” shouldn’t be stenography.

    • Mar 1, 20125:03 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Yeah, I’m definitely not saying it’s good reporting. It’s pretty shoddy. But it’s a slightly more explainable than if it was just missed without a lockout in between. Not gonna lie though, it is super annoying that he clearly made a mistake in his chat and then flat out denied something that is plainly obvious and verifiable. It’s not just annoying from a journalism standpoint/desire to get information right either. It’s kind of insulting as a reader.

      And I’ve said it before, but you’re a bit spoiled in Portland. The Blazers have a couple of the absolute best beat writers in the entire league along with arguably the best (other than, ahem, this one) team blog in the league in BlazersEdge covering that team.

      • Mar 1, 20125:49 pm
        by frankie d

        Reply

        yea, i know.  portland is nba-crazy.  the only pro game in town – other than soccer, which is bigtime here – and fans want every shred of information possible about the blazers. and local media provides it. rabid doesn’t even begin to describe the atmosphere here.
        when the local paper sent a beat reporter to accompany oden when he went to a doctor’s appointment for his knee, and he did a live report from the doctor’s office, i knew it was a bit overboard. 
        but it is fun, as a fan.
        there is definitely no news blackout, about anything… ever.

  • Mar 1, 20124:15 pm
    by Tiko

    Reply

    Tayshaun better get traded at the deadline

    Tayshaun plus our 2nd for Walton and the worst of their 1st’s

  • Mar 1, 20124:40 pm
    by Jodi Jezz

    Reply

    I hope we trade Prince to the Lakers, get Beasley from the T’Wolves, and the Lakers give there pick to the T’Wolves…Daye sucks, he isn’t going to be a starter in this league…

    • Mar 1, 20124:49 pm
      by Tiko

      Reply

      Beasley’s a head case.  they have no place on your team when you’re trying to put together a championship squad.  no thanks

  • Mar 1, 20125:54 pm
    by Noah

    Reply

    I think it is sad that all of Daye’s tangible development in the NBA has consisted of developing the Kevin Durant perfected rip move … which is now basically nullified. Good choice.

  • Mar 1, 20126:46 pm
    by Vince Ellis

    Reply

    Hi guys,
    I will tell you guys a story from my first year on the beat. I can’t remember the player (Stuckey, Afflalo), but I was in near panic near the Oct. 30 deadline because I didn’t see anything in the archives saying the Pistons had picked up the player option. Then I calmed down when a source told me they did back over the summer.
    Although I would prefer a release, when these deadlines come up from players’ rookie deals it’s not really news unless the team declines to pick up the option – basically giving up on the player. Hence you see articles when the DaJuan Summers and Terrico Whites of the world are dropped. I understand the confusion. Especially when I saw bloggers writing earlier this year that the Pistons had a decision to make that I already knew they had made back in June. It’s led to some inconsistent reporting. We report Stuckey, Summers and Jerebko last June, but no mention of Daye and Monroe. In my case at least, I know I was focused on the labor negotiations, coaching search and the draft during June so maybe that’s why Monroe and Daye slipped through the cracks. All we had to do was ask.
     

    • Mar 1, 201210:02 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Vince:

      First, really appreciate you taking the time to respond here. That’s really cool of you and something not many beat writers would do. I certainly (and I hope our readers) appreciate and commend you for doing that.

      What you’ve said makes sense — there was a ton going on in June, as you’ve mentioned, especially with a lockout pending giving you guys a short window to get comments/information from the team on anything player-related. Daye’s option getting picked up is not exactly Earth-shattering news, but it’s mildy interesting to diehards because he’s played so poorly and he’s a first round pick with a bit higher salary than a guy like White, so it represents a unique situation. I think that’s why there was some intrigue about it.

      Honestly, it’s not a detail I expect beat guys to be all over. It’s a pretty mundane/routine thing. But it’s also typically something teams announce. That, to me, is the weird part. A transaction, no matter how insignificant in the grand scheme, is typically something a team would self-report, even if it’s not of a ton of overall interest to the casual fan.

      Also, you answered the other weird question about the timing of it all. The timing was confusing, but if picking up these options way earlier than necessary is how the Pistons traditionally do this, I guess it makes more sense. It’s still strange compared to other teams — it seems like most teams go right up until the deadline. I believe Portland did this with Batum, a far far better player than Daye, before picking up his option and it seems like I’ve read of a few similar examples over the past couple seasons of going right to the deadline. And even when teams did pick up the options early on no-brainer players — like the Thunder with Ibaka and Harden — it always seems like it gets sent out in a release of some sort.

      Anyway, thanks again for clearing some things up. And also, for what it’s worth, I personally and I don’t think others who are credible readers of Pistons coverage think you or any other writer are “under Dumars’ control.” I do think that fans get really frustrated with a perceived lack of Dumars answering relevant, tough questions about things that have gone wrong over the last 3-4 years.

      I’ll quickly give you my frustration: I’m not a revisionist about players who the team has let go. I don’t think asking Dumars, “OMG! What were you thinking when you let Afflalo/Amir/Delfino go for nothing?!” is a smart or productive question. What I do think is an appropriate question, and one that to my knowledge, hasn’t been asked, is what has the breakdown in player development been here over the years? The team has obviously found value in the draft. But in several cases, that talent either didn’t produce or didn’t get minutes here, went elsewhere, and was immediately productive. What happened here? I think that’s a really fair and interesting topic, something I, as a fan, would love to hear Dumars thoughts on, and like I said, I’ve never come across it being addressed. It’s either written off as “why dwell on players who were gone?” or, from mostly the talk radio guys/columnists, it’s usually just focused on one or two individual players specifically and not the bigger picture issue of why was it hard to find minutes for guys who have proven to be versatile and effective players when the team’s crying need in those last couple contending years was versatile, effective and energetic bench players.

      I don’t think it’s necessarily fair to say that the beat writers don’t hold Dumars accountable. I get that he’s not all that accessible and has never talked to media all that much. But his non-answers have grown more frustrating as the team has gotten worse (winning teams’ fans can live with GMs who never say anything, like Presti in OKC who the next time he gives an insightful or useful quote will be the first time). I think a lot of fans have taken out that frustration on Dumars with the guys who have to report on the team and ask the questions, and that’s not totally fair to you guys.

    • Mar 2, 201211:01 am
      by Dan Feldman

      Reply

      Vince,

      To echo Patrick, I really appreciate you taking the time to comment. It’s really interesting perspective. For us, the Pistons picking up Daye’s (or anyone else’s) option is a definite story. For your audience, maybe not.

      Because of the lockout, I certainly understand why the story slipped through. It’s a new world, especially this season with all the altered dates, and picking that up on the fly is difficult. If I were on top of my game, this post would have been written in the leadup to Jan. 25 — at the latest. I obviously wasn’t.

      On the other hand, I think the lockout makes this more of a story than it would be otherwise. Given that the Pistons would have had part of this season to evaluate Daye, given that he’s struggled so much, I’d like to know their rationale for picking up the option. As I said in the post, I would’ve picked up the option at every turn based on my reasoning. I’m curious of the Pistons’ reasoning. Again, that’s something that would be of interest to our audience. Maybe not yours.

  • Mar 1, 20127:14 pm
    by Max

    Reply

    Regarding Dumars and the Pistons’ reticence on Daye’s option: you guys ever consider that anyone who gives a fig is already a die hard?  The NBA and its team’s media outlets serve the general audience and even try to gear themselves to non fans to attract new ones.  They know they already have the junkies and those who avidly follow the league.  Blogs and fantasy columns are the only place where anyone cares about players like Daye.  How long would the missing beat reporter’s article on the subject have been and how much notice would it attract in a newspaper or even the team’s web page these days?   In any context, it’s just not that big a story.

    • Mar 1, 201211:37 pm
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      I’m not sure i’m getting your point.

      First and foremost, the reason teams generally report and send news releases on mundane details like options getting picked up is simply to track transactions. Secondly, sending a news release saying, “Pistons pick up options on players X and Y” is a standard thing that every team in the league does. Even if you’re right, that the news isn’t super interesting to most fans, the reason all teams send these releases is because it’s the type of release/headline that virtually every NBA news site will cover. Local papers and team blogs will certainly post the release, but the headline mentioning the names of Greg Monroe and Austin Daye, two of the team’s young promising players (at the time, at least, in Daye’s case) will also be on national sites — AP, NBA.com, ESPN, SI, etc. That’s pretty valuable for Google and SEO purposes. The Pistons haven’t had many national headlines, coverage (at least for positive things) or interest over the last few seasons. A short press release last June saying that they picked up the option is quick, easy and does bring value in the form of a press release that is all but guaranteed to appear on heavily trafficked sites all over the place. That’s why it’s something that basically all teams do when they have legit transaction or contract news. It’s not that the news was super important. It’s just that it’s really weird that a team wouldn’t take advantage of a surefire opportunity for national coverage. That part of it just doesn’t make any sense.

  • Mar 1, 20128:30 pm
    by Vince Ellis

    Reply

    And wow, I wasn’t aware that I was under Dumars’ control. Now that’s power for ya if I’m not even aware of it, :)

    • Mar 1, 201210:07 pm
      by frankie d

      Reply

      that is the best kind of mind control.  when the subject doesn’t even realize that he’s being played.  
      how about writing stories that aren’t based on press releases from the team?  by revealing that you would have written an article on this issue if a release had been provided, you’ve confirmed what many of us have always thought: that your “journalism” consists of regurgitating press releases from the team.  and if joe d doesn’t see fit to put out a press release on something, the beat writers won’t pursue it.   sounds like being under the control of someone in my book. 
      and…that is not what i consider journalism.  i don’t think anyone who’s ever written an article for their college paper would consider that to be journalism.  unfortunately, as you’ve just confirmed, that is exactly how you do your job.
      the daye thing is pretty petty and minor in and of itself.  it’s only real relevance is that it confirms the typically shoddy approach to sports journalism of the major detroit dailies..

      • Mar 1, 201210:59 pm
        by Patrick Hayes

        Reply

        Dude, your comment is pretty out of line here. This is why blogs can’t have nice things. We get a beat writer actually taking the time to stop in and converse about an interesting, inside-baseball topic and you’re going to assault the man’s integrity?

        Vince gave some good insight. And you said yourself, this wasn’t a vital piece of news. Honestly, something like this would probably merit at most two sentences in a newspaper. The bigger issue, to me, is that the team never reported this itself on its website. As Dan said in his post, it’s a chance to get your two young players in headlines.

        • Mar 2, 20121:15 pm
          by frankie d

          Reply

          well, i certainly was not attempting to take away anything from the blog.  in fact, i attempt to do the opposite anytime i can, as i often link to posts here at other places i may blog or comment.
          a couple of things…
          first, imho, if a person puts their work out into the public – as a journalists does – they invite comment and feedback.  that is the nature of the work.   and when a person who does that kind of work, actually inserts himself into the middle of a public discourse on an issue that touches on some aspect of his work, he is not only putting his work out for public consumption and comment, but he is affirmatively participating in a public discourse.  as such, one has to expect feedback and comment on the quality of both the work that is public and the comments and statements made in course of that public discussion.
          does the fact that someone holds a certain position make them immune from the give and take that normally goes on in a public forum?
          is a sportswriter a figure who’s public work is there for public comment not to be criticized?
          does that person have the right to comment on something i, for instance, have writtten, but i’m not allowed to respond to his comments?
          my view is that once a person puts their work out for the public to consume, and especially if that person voluntarily inserts himself in the middle of a public discussion, his comments are fair game.  and his work is fair game.
          i don’t think this is the first time vince ellis has commented on the blog.  i’ve seen his name before and while i imagined that it was the freep writer, i was not sure, and frankly, really didn’t care that much.
          yesterday, he’d written something that i disagreed with initially, making one ridiculous comment that dan correctly noted as being false: “when these deadlines come up from players’ rookie deals it’s not really news unless the team declines to pick up the option…”  this is a ludicrous statement, especially considering that it comes from a guy who is paid by a news organization to keep up with and write about basic facts and issues concerning the team.
          but i let that go.  whatever.  if he wants to make a statement that reveals the way the he does or does not do his job, he is welcome to do so.
          but then he specifically addressed something that i’d written – i noted that detroit sportswriters appeared to only write those things that the team  wanted them to write, a fact he implicitly confirmed when he wrote that he would have written something on this issue if he’d been prompted by a team press release – and i simply wanted to respond to the fact that he addressed something i’d brought forward.
          i don’t think i impugned his integrity.  i didn’t attack him in an ad hominem fashion.  i simply made a comment on what he had written.
          hopefully, he’s secure enough professionally that one deluded commenter’s view of his competence – which i did find lacking and commented on, rather than his integrity – matters little to him.
          in a larger sense, what i see happen in most “sports journalism” in the detroit market is essentially stenography.  and this reflects laziness, rather than a lack of integrity.  and his initial post, perhaps unwittingly, confirmed that suspision.  imho.
          Although I would prefer a release…” and “I was focused on the labor negotiations, coaching search and the draft during June so maybe that’s why Monroe and Daye slipped through the cracks. All we had to do was ask.”
          his statements, not mine, and they say it all.  if he’d been told, by the team, about certain news, he would have reported what they told him.  they didn’t tell him what to write, so he didn’t write anything.
          and he did not ask about or investigate or research the matter, and he never bothered to ask anyone.  again, his statements, not mine.  his own statements provide an indictment of his competence, certainly, and one can possibly expand beyond to other areas.  as i’ve noted, i rarely read the detroit dailies because of the issues that have been brought forward by this post and ellis’ response.  his response says everything that needs to be said about the sad state of detroit sports journalism.  
          if i was a bit indelicate in pointing that fact out, then i’ll certainly acknowledge a lack of tact.

           

          • Mar 2, 20121:35 pm
            by Patrick Hayes

            Every writer or person who puts something out there for the public to consume is certainly open for criticism.

            But what Vince did — showing up in the comments section of a blog — was both rare and refreshing. Seriously, I think that should be applauded. Sports journalism would be in a much better place if every sports writer out there was willing to go talk to his/her readers like that in any forum.

            You are certainly free to criticize as you wish, but I do think a sports writer at a major daily coming into the comments of a blog and saying essentially, “I missed this, here’s why I missed it, I should’ve had it,” is a really cool thing to do and just not something most would take the time to do. Openness with readers would serve all journalism well, and I just don’t want to discourage that by essentially hammering perhaps the only mainstream media writer I’ve seen take the time to do what he just did.

          • Mar 2, 20121:50 pm
            by frankie d

            i agree that it was a gracious and unusual thing to do.
            which is why i didn’t hammer him for making the comment about the news not being news and the other aspects of his original post.
            what got me, however, was his specific comment that was directed to me.
            i should mention, in the spirit of full disclosure, that i’ve had a private email exchange with mr. ellis on exactly the issue he addressed in his second comment.  it happened a few weeks ago, and while he may not have specifically connected my post to the email exchange, i do know that he is very sensitive about that particular issue. 
            i’d love to see him post here regularly and maintain a dialogue.  it would enliven things here, certainly, provide an invaluable perspective, and probably inform his own work in a positive fashion.

      • Mar 2, 20124:46 pm
        by Max

        Reply

        @Frankie D.   The big whole in your logic is that you don’t allow for the idea that a writer can choose to write those articles for which he has interest.   The recent article on Grantland about “The Malice in the Palace” is an example of one that exists because the writer decided to take up the subject.
        Sports journalists surely take cues for subjects from team’s press releases but this is actually more universal to reporting in general than you might think as journalists receive press releases from a variety of sources and outlets and most of them lazily reproduce their own version of these releases and call them their own articles.
        However, journalists also still write articles for which they have interest.   Vince Ellis said, “all we had to do was ask” regarding the Daye option and I take their not asking the question more as a sign that the subject failed to evince even enough interest to occur to themselves than as a sign that they choose their topics according to Dumars’ whims.
        Finally, the overlap between the Pistons’ press releases and what any writer who covered the team would naturally be writing about during any given week, regardless of any press release, would stop me from drawing a causal connection.

        • Mar 2, 20125:17 pm
          by frankie d

          Reply

          @ max,
          no, i definitely take that into consideration.  what i see as typical  beat writing encompasses that part of doing the job – random stuff you might be interested in that may or may not be prompted by a team press release – and then the nuts and bolts basics of doing a beat writer’s job.
          what are the nuts and bolts?
          who’s signed to what type of contract and whether a team picks up an option or the player picks up an option…that stuff is as basic as it gets.  that determines lots of stuff, the most basic, obviously, being whether the player is going to be around one year or two years and those facts always factor into how a player is treated by their team.
          other nuts and bolts stuff?…whether a player is on a guaranteed contract?….a ten day contract…signed for 3 or 5 or 4 years…injuries…how long a player may be out, if there is any estimate…who’s starting(if there is any question)…game previews that give info on upcoming games and teams…lots of other stuff that escapes me now.
          just basic reporting that informs the fans on a basic level.
          and once that reporting is done, sure, a reporter is obviously encouraged to come up with interesting and unique things to write about.
          in college, i wrote for my college newspaper for 3 years.  i wrote sports articles, primarily, though i did many other things at the paper.  at the time, i dealt with the nba, the lions, big ten football and basketball, and pretty much whatever i had an interest in.  while the job of a professional writer at a major daily is different in many ways, it is undoubtedly very similar in some very basic ways.  
          i wrote a bunch of those nuts and bolts articles on my school’s teams, and i always had the freedom to come up with ideas and my editor was typically very open to those ideas. (one thing i’m most proud of is an interview with larry brown, when he was coaching the nuggets, way back when.  he was a character even then.)
          so yea, i understand the dynamic.  but the fact was this: until i did the basic stuff, and unless i did the basic reporting, i never got the chance to do the more interesting stuff i might come up with. 
          informing fans about a team picking up the option on its first round draft choices is about as basic as it gets.

          • Mar 2, 20129:06 pm
            by Max

            That’s awesome that you interviewed coach Brown!

          • Mar 2, 201211:53 pm
            by frankie d

            larry brown was one of the more interesting people in the old aba.  and the aba had merged with the nba.   i contacted a bunch of teams, trying to do a preseason preview, and larry was the only guy who called back, i think.  i was just a low level, university of michigan student reporter, but larry called me back and gave me a nice bit of time.  extremely gracious and nice of him.  he sounded like he had just smoked a big bowl of something nice, when i spoke with him, but that was just my impression, at that time.  the interview is in the archives of the university of michigan’s michigan daily, i think, 1978.   the michigan daily nba season preview, with an interview with larry brown, coach of the denver nuggets.
            it was awesome.  and i am not being facetious.   he was a very, very interesting guy, even back then.  larry brown was just different.  not your typical professional coach.  how many pro coaches would spend a half hour talking to a student reporter at a university paper?   little did i know that hed end up as one of the league’s best coaches ever.

  • Mar 1, 201211:57 pm
    by Mark

    Reply

    I think picking up the option was the right move. If they didn’t, they’d put themselves in the position of every team knowing they NEED to trade him by the deadline, and end up having to give him away for peanuts or let him go for nothing.

    By taking the option, now there is rush to move him and can if they do want to trade him, can field offers for another year, if they choose. Plus he’s an asset as a sweetner to any other deal they might get.

    As for why they didn’t announce it. Probably because he’s an 11th-12th man. Do teams usually announce picking up options on their 12th man?

  • Mar 1, 201211:57 pm
    by Mark

    Reply

    I think picking up the option was the right move. If they didn’t, they’d put themselves in the position of every team knowing they NEED to trade him by the deadline, and end up having to give him away for peanuts or let him go for nothing.

    By taking the option, now there is rush to move him and can if they do want to trade him, can field offers for another year, if they choose. Plus he’s an asset as a sweetner to any other deal they might get.

    As for why they didn’t announce it. Probably because he’s an 11th-12th man. Do teams usually announce picking up options on their 12th man?

    • Mar 1, 201211:58 pm
      by Mark

      Reply

      Maybe they’re supposed to announce all moves, just saying he’s so insignificant, don’t even see the point.

    • Mar 2, 20129:48 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Well, he wasn’t as insignificant at the time the option was picked up. And they also reportedly picked up Monroe’s option at the same time they picked up Daye’s, so that makes it even more strange that it wasn’t announced.

      Like I’ve said above, not a big deal in the grand scheme, but it’s just weird and not how most teams handle transaction news, even minor news.

  • Mar 2, 201212:50 am
    by Jon

    Reply

    Trade Tayshawn and a #1 draft pick for a young center (like Demarkus Cousins who is unhappy in Sac.), play Jerebco and Daye at small forward, Monroe at PF, and Cousins at center. Phase out Ben Wallace, and use Maxiell as back-up at c/pf. Dump a useless Will Bynum, and play a resonably productive Walker Russel Jr. It’s possible to do this,, Sacramento could use Prince, he would probably be their best small forward.

    • Mar 2, 20129:46 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Cousins is an absolute pipe dream. Not only is he having a really good season and in really good shape for the first time, but when he wasn’t getting along with the coach, the Kings fired the coach. There’s no way they trade him unless the Pistons are willing to part with Monroe for him, which they are not.

  • Mar 2, 20123:33 am
    by Domnick

    Reply

    even if the Pistons Picked up the option, he is still tradable right?

    • Mar 2, 20124:11 am
      by Jon

      Reply

      I am pretty sure after 90 days of signing or e

    • Mar 2, 20129:44 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Yeah, he didn’t sign a new contract, his option was just picked up in an existing one, so there isn’t a waiting period to trade him like there was with guys who signed new deals this offseason — Prince, Stuckey, Jerebko.

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