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Rodney Stuckey twitter account was real, when it existed

Last week, I wrote about some cryptic tweets from an unverified Rodney Stuckey Twitter account that hinted at a desire for a ‘fresh start,’ whatever that meant. The caveat was that since the account wasn’t verified, the veracity of the tweets was hard to confirm. Well, Justin Rogers of MLive asked Stuckey whether @HimOn1 was indeed Stuckey’s account:

For anyone wondering, Rodney Stuckey verified with me that @HimOn1 is his real Twitter account.

I said ‘was’ above because shortly after Rogers asked Stuckey about it, the account was deleted. As I said in the previous post, I didn’t take Stuckey’s tweets as him necessarily truly wanting out of Detroit. He and many restricted free agents get frustrated (like Josh Childress going to Greece rather than re-signing for what he perceived to be a low offer by the Hawks when he was an RFA, for instance) by how little leverage they have in contract negotiations. Deleting the account after confirming it was real probably just means Stuckey didn’t want to use Twitter as a promotional tool like some athletes do. He only had about 1,000 followers, a number which would’ve surely grown had it gotten out that it was his real account.

7 Comments

  • Dec 19, 201110:01 am
    by Sebastian

    Reply

    I for one could less about a Twitter or a dam(n) Facebook account and you can through in any other social media broadcast tool.
    I wish that my man, Stuckey would had not been so juvenile as to vent via these means, but when the statement: “he wanted a new start” was reported – too much was made of it by the local Detroit press and blogs, such as PistonPowered.
    Indeed, Stuckey would like a new start and so should every Piston currently on the roster and certainly every Pistons fan would like a new start.
    Losing is for the birds. Playing until late May and to be the last team standing holding the Larry O’Brian Trophy is what it is all about.
    I just glad that Stuckey was resigned. Now, the Stuckey and Knight era in the “D” can begin.

    • Dec 19, 201110:04 am
      by Sebastian

      Reply

      Allow me to clean up the first sentence in the previous post. What I was meaning to type is: “I for one could care less about a dam(n) Twitter account or a dam(n) Facebook account or any other social media broadcast tool.”

      • Dec 19, 20112:29 pm
        by tarsier

        Reply

        Sorry to nitpick but this is really one of my pet peeves.
        “I could care less” means that I care about something, at least to some degree.
        “I couldn’t care less” is what people mean when they say “I could care less” and it literally means that I care so little about this that that amount could not possibly diminish because it is already zero.

    • Dec 19, 201110:07 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      I would agree with you if the ‘fresh start’ tweet was the only thing he said. But it wasn’t. He also highlighted one of his followers saying he’d be better off on ‘a good team’ and when someone asked him if he’d like to play in Portland he said he’d love to.

      I don’t much care about any of that — like I said, it was probably frustration with having little negotiating power to get the kind of offer he wanted. I’m not in the business of psychologically analyzing what athletes mean with their vague tweets, but whatever he meant by it, it was newsworthy to report.

  • Dec 19, 201110:50 am
    by Youssif

    Reply

    Good move for him to close the account — that Twitter feed was not really doing him any favors. Given that he re-signed, I’m interested in what he really thinks about all of this — was it just frustration that led him to vent the way he did or is it common for athletes like Stuckey to near-openly despise the franchise they play for but still sign with it for stability/financial reasons? Kind of how many people view their employer. Could he be the first example that social media has bubbled to the surface that unveils a broader paradigm or was it just him losing his cool due to inexperience in negotiating?

    • Dec 19, 20112:30 pm
      by tarsier

      Reply

      he certainly wouldn’t be the first example of anything

  • Dec 19, 20115:45 pm
    by gmehl1977

    Reply

    As far as i am concerned i am just glad they resigned him. I am even more glad he was resigned to what i feel is a move able contract because after all the time and effort we put in developing him it would of been ‘criminal’ letting him walk without trying to get something for him. At the moment Stuckey is on my $hit list but i am giving him this season to win me back. I am not a big twitter fan and feel that in a lot of instances it seems that athletes use it now to start stories to either get traded and start rumors. It might be because i am oldschool but to me twitter is a cowards tool to vent what they otherwise don’t have the balls to say out a loud.

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