↓ Login/Logout ↓
Schedule/Results
↓ Roster ↓
Salaries
↓ Archives ↓
↓ About ↓

Archive → August, 2011

Jonas Jerebko not risking playing overseas right now

Jonas Jerebko‘s former Italian League team, Biella, would like him to play for them, but according to Jorge Sierra of HoopsHype, Jerebko is remaining cautious after his Achilles injury:

Free agent forward Jonas Jerebko has had some discussions with Biella of Italy, but he will not return to his former team at this point, Marco Atripaldi, the club’s general manager, told HoopsHype.

“We talked with him, but he’s a little concerned about an injury and has decided to stay in the U.S. for now,” Atripaldi said.

The team will reportedly find room for Jerebko if he changes his mind, but I have to think with restricted free agency pending when the lockout ends, it’s a smart move for Jerebko to avoid playing overseas and risking an injury that could cost him in his next contract.

Former Pistons coach Scotty Robertson dies of cancer

Former Pistons coach Scotty Robertson died today, according to the Shreveport Times.

In “The Detroit Pistons: More Than Four Decades of Motor City Memories,” Steve Addy recalled Robertson’s first season with the Pistons:

The NBA hadn’t been especially fair to 50-year-old Scotty Robertson, who on June 5, 1980 was named the 16th head coach of the Pistons. He had two previous coaching stints, but neither lasted long enough to get a read on his skills. He was the first head coach the expansion New Orleans Jazz in 1974, but was canned after a 1-14 start. Then with Chicago in ‘78-79, he coached the Bulls to an 11-15 record in the final 26 games. “I never got a good chance,” Robertson said. “I feel this club can win and I’m not talking down the road. I’m talking about now.” His optimism would serve him well during  a difficult 21-61 season.

A photo accompanied that passage, and it was captioned:

Arkansas-born Scotty Robertson brought a folksy manner to to the Pistons’ head coaching job.

Bill Walton wishes he would’ve punched Rasheed Wallace

If you have some time, Jonathan Abrams’ piece on Arvydas Sabonis at Grantland is well worth a read. Pistons fans, I think, will particularly enjoy this bit involving Bill Walton and Rasheed Wallace:

Ultimately, the Portland teams wasted their potential. In 2000, Portland took the Lakers to a seventh game of the Western Conference finals. The Trail Blazers led by 15 in the final 10 minutes and lost, 89-84. Sabonis fouled out with 2:44 left in the game after a couple of questionable calls. “It’s one of the worst games that happened in my life,” Sabonis said. “You have three or four. This is one of them. Last game and winning 15 points in 10 minutes and losing. It’s difficult. Difficult to forget.”

In the following season, Wallace threw the towel at Sabonis during a timeout of a game against the Lakers. Sabonis had accidentally smacked Wallace’s face earlier when he collided in the post with O’Neal…

Walton, who was broadcasting the game nationally, still feels remorse over the incident. “It was one of the lowest moments of my life,” he said. “If I was any kind of a man, I would have got up from that broadcast table and walked across the court and punched Rasheed Wallace in the nose. But I let Sabonis and the game of basketball and the human race down that day.”

The towel-throwing incident is actually a good indicator of how much Wallace matured by the time he was with the Pistons. Oh sure, he was still out of control emotionally on the court, but he seemed to become a much better teammate by the time he was with Detroit. It certainly helped that he wasn’t counted on to be Detroit’s go-to player too. That pressure clearly got to him in Portland.

But I would still have loved to watch Walton lumber out of his broadcast chair to try and punch Wallace in the face.

Did Dennis Rodman’s lack of offense help or hurt his teams?

Ethan Sherwood Strauss at HoopSpeak has an interesting take on Dennis Rodman and his offense, or lack thereof, wondering if it actually mattered that Rodman basically abstained from one end of the court. I liked this passage a lot:

For now, Dennis Rodman signifies the gap between Dave Berri and John Hollinger. Berri’s stat (Wins Produced) doesn’t punish Rodman’s wall flowering and Hollinger’s PER does. Most advanced stats tend to reward participatory players. After all, if everyone played like Dennis Rodman, offenses would score 40 points per game.

But very few played like Dennis Rodman in a league so obsessed with scoring and scorers. And very few won like Dennis Rodman, a player who contributed to 55+ win seasons for three different franchises.

There’s probably no way the debate on this will ever be over. Scoring and offense are valued so much that some basketball fans will simply never understand the value of a player like Rodman. But I hope the discussion is an ongoing one, particularly considering Ben Wallace‘s case for the Hall of Fame will be very similar to Rodman’s and I’m interested to see if Rodman getting in ultimately help’s Wallace get in.

Also, apropos of nothing, The Hoops Doctors compiled video of some of Rodman’s best moments irritating opponents, including commenter gmehl’s favorite, Rodman vs. Frank Brickowski in the 1996 NBA Finals.

Assist Charts 2010-11: Ben Wallace

This is the latest installment of a series called “Assist Charts.” For each of the 13 Pistons who played this year, I’m going to show whom they assisted and who assisted them.

Each post will be divided into two sections: Player assists to and Assists from player. Player assists to shows who the featured player assisted. Assists from player shows who assisted the featured player.

Each section will display two pie graphs and corresponding tables. One graph and table will show totals, and the other set will show per 36 minutes.

All the graphs and tables are color-coded with a specific color assigned to each player throughout the series. Point guards are blue. Shooting guards are orange. Small forwards are green. Power forwards are red. Centers are yellow.

Player assists to

Total

image

Field goal Amount
McGrady 7
Stuckey 17
Bynum 0
Gordon 7
Hamilton 9
Prince 13
Daye 7
Summers 1
Wilcox 1
Villanueva 5
Maxiell 0
Monroe 5

Per 36 minutes with each player

image

Field goal Minutes together Amount per 36 minutes together
McGrady 527 0.48
Stuckey 777 0.79
Bynum 156 0.00
Gordon 571 0.44
Hamilton 584 0.55
Prince 1070 0.44
Daye 297 0.85
Summers 15 2.40
Wilcox 15 2.40
Villanueva 322 0.56
Maxiell 240 0.00
Monroe 378 0.48

What we learned

Ben Wallace has a reputation for passing well for his size, and I still think he does, but he didn’t assist any particular player extremely often last season. If anyone stood out as a recipient, it was Austin Daye.

Assists to Player

Total

image

Assist Amount
McGrady 9
Stuckey 6
Bynum 0
Gordon 2
Hamilton 5
Prince 7
Daye 1
Summers 0
Wilcox 0
Villanueva 1
Maxiell 0
Monroe 3
None 33

Per 36 minutes with each player

image

Assist Minutes together Amount per 36 minutes together
McGrady 527 0.61
Stuckey 777 0.28
Bynum 156 0.00
Gordon 571 0.13
Hamilton 584 0.31
Prince 1070 0.24
Daye 297 0.12
Summers 15 0.00
Wilcox 15 0.00
Villanueva 322 0.11
Maxiell 240 0.00
Monroe 378 0.29
None 1238 0.96

What we learned

Ben Wallace didn’t make many baskets last season, but Tracy McGrady assisted him most often. I think that speaks to McGrady’s point guard skills – that he could pass even somewhat successfully to such a limited scorer.

Previous

Mike Woodson ignored instruction from Atlanta Hawks owners

Michael Cunningham of The Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

During the 2009-10 season, Hawks owners implored then-coach Mike Woodson to give more minutes to rookie guard Jeff Teague and less to All-Star guard Joe Johnson. The owners also wanted Woodson to steer the Hawks away from the isolation-heavy offense, the people knowledgeable of the conversations said.

Woodson didn’t do any of those things to the owners’ satisfaction, which were major reasons he was not retained after the season.

I wonder what role, if any, that played in Woodson’s chances of getting hired by the Pistons. On one hand, owners are probably leery of hiring an insubordinate coach. On the other hand, most owners don’t appear as hands on with coaching decisions as the Hawks’ owners do.

Video: Tayshaun Prince, Brandon Knight included in highlights of Kentucky pros vs. Dominican Republic exhibition

Via AllKYHoops, the highlight reel below is from last night’s exhibition game between University of Kentucky alums and the Dominican Republic. The Dominican team won 91-86. Kentucky’s team featured Pistons players Tayshaun Prince and Brandon Knight. Charlie Villanueva plays for the Dominican national team, but didn’t play in the game due to injury.

Assist Charts 2010-11: Richard Hamilton

This is the latest installment of a series called “Assist Charts.” For each of the 13 Pistons who played this year, I’m going to show whom they assisted and who assisted them.

Each post will be divided into two sections: Player assists to and Assists from player. Player assists to shows who the featured player assisted. Assists from player shows who assisted the featured player.

Each section will display two pie graphs and corresponding tables. One graph and table will show totals, and the other set will show per 36 minutes.

All the graphs and tables are color-coded with a specific color assigned to each player throughout the series. Point guards are blue. Shooting guards are orange. Small forwards are green. Power forwards are red. Centers are yellow.

Player assists to

Total

image

Field goal Amount
McGrady 6
Stuckey 16
Bynum 6
Gordon 4
Prince 48
Daye 16
Summers 0
Wilcox 18
Villanueva 19
Maxiell 12
Monroe 21
Wallace 5

Per 36 minutes with each player

image

Field goal Minutes together Amount per 36 minutes together
McGrady 440 0.49
Stuckey 942 0.61
Bynum 304 0.71
Gordon 218 0.66
Prince 1131 1.53
Daye 424 1.36
Summers 24 0.00
Wilcox 305 2.12
Villanueva 359 1.91
Maxiell 478 0.90
Monroe 778 0.97
Wallace 584 0.31

What we learned

Unsurprisingly, Richard Hamilton assisted Tayshaun Prince often. The Hamilton-to-Prince alley oop has been a staple for years, and the trust between those two – on and off the court – especially stood out this year.

But a bit surprisingly, Hamilton assisted Chris Wilcox and Charlie Villanueva more often per minute with each player than he did Prince. And Austin Daye doesn’t trail Prince by much. Maybe Hamilton just works well with all forwards.

Assists to Player

Total

image

Assist Amount
McGrady 18
Stuckey 80
Bynum 27
Gordon 4
Prince 45
Daye 13
Summers 0
Wilcox 5
Villanueva 6
Maxiell 5
Monroe 13
Wallace 9
None 63

Per 36 minutes with each player

image

Assist Minutes together Amount per 36 minutes together
McGrady 440 1.47
Stuckey 942 3.06
Bynum 304 3.20
Gordon 218 0.66
Prince 1131 1.43
Daye 424 1.10
Summers 24 0.00
Wilcox 305 0.59
Villanueva 359 0.60
Maxiell 478 0.38
Monroe 778 0.60
Wallace 584 0.55
None 1498 1.51

What we learned

As we all know, Richard Hamilton shoots most efficiently when a point guard is setting him up. That’s likely why Will Bynum, Rodney Stuckey and Tracy McGrady assisted him most often per minute together.

Of course, Tayshaun Prince wasn’t too far behind. Those two really stuck together last year.

Interestingly, Austin Daye didn’t trail Prince by much. If Prince walks in free agency, at least when it comes to working with Hamilton, it appears Daye is ready step in.

Previous

Terrico White fired agent during season

We already knew Rodney Stuckey fired his agent, as did Austin Daye. But Terrico White beat them both to the punch, according to Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press:

Pistons guard Terrico White fired Todd Ramasar before he even got through his rookie season. Ramasar also works for BDA. White, who missed last season with a broken right foot, hired Mitch Frankel of Impact Sports.

I hope White has faith in Frankel, because White’s contract situation is/was extremely complicated.

Ben Gordon on last season: ‘It was just a mess’

Ben Gordon recently spoke with Grantland’s Jonathan Abrams, mostly about the lockout, but he also discussed the dysfunction of the Pistons last season:

Grantland: Last year was a tough year for the Pistons and the bottom hit with reports of players boycotting a shoot-around in protest of the former coach John Kuester. What’s the backstory behind that situation?

Gordon: “Last year, everything that possibly could have went wrong, went wrong. We had a lot of talent. There were a lot of issues in the front office, on the floor, with coaches, with players. It was just a mess. People from the outside looking in don’t realize how bad it was. It wasn’t conducive for playing basketball at a high level and it showed. It was pretty much what everybody saw. Some guys showed up to play. Some guys didn’t show up to play. Whatever point people were trying to prove by showing up or nothing showing up, those points were taken. Six guys showed up. Six guys played and a few other guys decided not to play that night. That was one of the uglier moments during the season. Moving forward, I don’t see that happening anymore. That was probably one of the lowest basketball moments I’ve ever been a part of. Because we’re all a team and we all shared that negative light. Regardless of who played that night, it was bad. But moving forward, I think the emphasis will be much different.”

That’s … wow. Here was Brian Packey’s take at Detroit Bad Boys:

There’s a lot here, including the emphasis I’ve added. We (the ‘people from the outside looking in’) were let on to believe that it was all blown out of proportion by the damn media, although I don’t think anybody actually believed that. Gordon is saying it was actually worse.

I actually respect the directness of Gordon’s answer there. As Packey pointed out, all of the boycott comments at the time were of the ‘no big deal, these things happen in a locker room, guys are passionate, etc.’ variety. It would be nice if any of those statements were true, but I think it’s pretty clear now that new coach or not, the Pistons still have serious rifts in the locker room that will need to be fixed when the lockout ends.