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Assist Charts 2010-11: Charlie Villanueva

This is the latest installment of a series called “Assist Charts.” For each of the 13 Pistons who played this year, I’m going to show whom they assisted and who assisted them.

Each post will be divided into two sections: Player assists to and Assists from player. Player assists to shows who the featured player assisted. Assists from player shows who assisted the featured player.

Each section will display two pie graphs and corresponding tables. One graph and table will show totals, and the other set will show per 36 minutes.

All the graphs and tables are color-coded with a specific color assigned to each player throughout the series. Point guards are blue. Shooting guards are orange. Small forwards are green. Power forwards are red. Centers are yellow.

Player assists to

Total

image

Field goal Amount
McGrady 4
Stuckey 2
Bynum 2
Gordon 6
Hamilton 6
Prince 11
Daye 4
Summers 1
Wilcox 5
Maxiell 2
Monroe 4
Wallace 1

Per 36 minutes with each player

image

Field goal Minutes together Amount per 36 minutes together
McGrady 588 0.24
Stuckey 740 0.10
Bynum 726 0.10
Gordon 1194 0.18
Hamilton 359 0.60
Prince 729 0.54
Daye 546 0.26
Summers 105 0.34
Wilcox 307 0.59
Maxiell 391 0.18
Monroe 650 0.22
Wallace 322 0.11

What we learned

Overshadowed by his larger problems, Charlie Villanueva hasn’t passed well in Detroit. His two worst seasons for assists per game and assists per 36 minutes have both come in his two years with the Pistons. Villanueva has never stood out as a passer, but he’s been particularly irrelevant in Detroit.

Per 36 minutes with each of his teammates, Villanueva assisted Richard Hamilton most often (.60 assists per 36 minutes). But every other Piston who played last year had a teammate he assisted more often per 36 minutes together. Essentially, it appears Villanueva failed to develop a passing rapport with a single teammate last year.

Assists to Player

Total

image

Assist Amount
McGrady 22
Stuckey 51
Bynum 44
Gordon 64
Hamilton 19
Prince 16
Daye 10
Summers 0
Wilcox 1
Maxiell 1
Monroe 6
Wallace 5
None 74

Per 36 minutes with each player

image

Assist Minutes together Amount per 36 minutes together
McGrady 588 1.35
Stuckey 740 2.48
Bynum 726 2.18
Gordon 1194 1.93
Hamilton 359 1.91
Prince 729 0.79
Daye 546 0.66
Summers 105 0.00
Wilcox 307 0.12
Maxiell 391 0.09
Monroe 650 0.33
Wallace 322 0.56
None 1666 1.60

What we learned

Charlie Villanueva had a very high percentage of his field goals assisted by guards, and small forwards also assisted many more of Villanueva’s baskets than bigs did. Villanueva made fewer shots assisted by big men per 36 minutes on the court with each of them than Greg Monroe or Chris Wilcox did – which is even more notable when you consider Monroe and Wilcox were counting on assists from Villanueva, an uninspiring passer, and Villanueva gained from assists from Monroe and Wilcox, both pretty good passers for their size. Many of Monroe’s and Wilcox’s successful passes went to cutters. This suggests Villanueva didn’t move very actively without the ball.

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6 Comments

  • Aug 15, 20112:18 pm
    by Tiko

    Reply

    I don’t know what any of this means. What I do know is that Villanueva sucks at basketball

  • Aug 15, 20112:48 pm
    by brgulker

    Reply

    Dan,

    To stir the pot in a friendly way.

    In a previous comment thread, you criticized Lee’s contract, especially bemoaning his inability to create shots. Looking at this data prompted me to check 82games.com’s numbers for the two players.

    Last year, Charlie’s assisted FG% spiked quite high, but historically, Lee and Charlie are assisted on very similar %’s of their made baskets.

    Without a Synergy account and lots and lots of painful data mining, I’m not sure if there’s a better measure of “shot creation” than that. Of course, there’s always your eyeballs, but yours and mine seem to be saying different things.

    Thoughts?

    • Aug 17, 201110:46 am
      by Dan Feldman

      Reply

      Simply, Lee made more putbacks than Villanueva. Lee can’t make any more of those than he does now. Like most players, he grabs every rebound he can and attempts putbacks nearly every time the opportunity is available. I’ll look up specific numbers in a bit.

  • Aug 15, 20114:04 pm
    by neutes

    Reply

    1 assist per game for a career average. He doesn’t steal the ball, doesn’t block shots, doesn’t rebound. Seriously what good is CV? He doesn’t turn it over much, but that’s because all he does when he has the ball is shoot it.
     
    For comparison sake only Brandon Bass, Tyler Hansborough, Derrick Favors, and Ed Davis (two rookies) had lower Assist percentages than Villanueva at PF last season. So at least he’s not the worst. And for fun David Lee was the 12th best passing big man.
     
    As for Gulks comment above. Anyone can shoot can’t they? I’d rather have Lee not create any shots than CV create bad ones. Seems to me the players that ‘create’ the most shots are the players that shoot the poorest.

  • Aug 15, 20115:48 pm
    by Jodi Jezz

    Reply

    Gordon is the best!!!

  • Aug 30, 20114:34 pm
    by JT's Hoops Blog

    Reply

    Through those charts, you can see how dysfunctional that team really was.  Those huge black spaces representing none passing to them speaks volumes on how selfish thise players were. 

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