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Greg Monroe makes David Thorpe’s All-Rookie team over DeMarcus Cousins

Greg Monroe made David Thorpe’s All-Rookie team:

This spot seemed to belong to DeMarcus Cousins, and in some respects, Monroe is the anti-Cousins. If Cousins had been off the board at No. 5, the Kings probably would have taken Monroe, so this has worked out beautifully for Detroit. To start the season, Monroe lacked assertiveness, but he quietly ramped up his production while keeping mistakes at a minimum, another contrast with Cousins. He has become a consistent force with upside — he’s just 20 years old.

Monroe is a lock to make the actual All-Rookie team, which doesn’t specify positions. To make Thorpe’s All-Rookie team, which designates positions, over DeMarcus Cousins is a little more impressive.

However, Monroe didn’t make Thorpe’s list of the five rookies with the most promising futures. John Wall, Blake Griffin, Derrick Favors, Patrick Patterson and DeMarcus Cousins did. I get Wall, Griffin and Cousins. I’d say Monroe is about equal with Favors. But Patterson? C’mon.

10 Comments

  • Apr 14, 20118:53 pm
    by rick

    Reply

    That makes no sense. He picks Monroe over Cousins by position, but then picks Patterson as being an overall better player than Monroe long-term?

    • Apr 14, 20118:57 pm
      by Dan Feldman

      Reply

      I disagree with Thorpe, but it makes logical sense. The All-Rookie team is based solely on this year. The most promising players is his prediction for the future.

      • Apr 15, 20111:04 am
        by rick

        Reply

        How does that make logical sense? Common sense says the guy thats good now will be good later. There is no reason to think a guy that is not as good now will be better later, logically. Especially since Patterson is older and undersized for his position. I could see if Patterson was the younger player who was raw, but had a higher ceiling, but its the exact opposite. Patterson is the older one who already had a polished skillset right out of college. Whereas Monroe was the younger one whose skillset was very raw still, and at his size does have the ability of being an All-Star at his position. I know its just one writers opinion, I just dont get his logic.

        • Apr 15, 20118:55 am
          by Patrick Hayes

          Reply

          Patterson is more athletic and has range out to 18 feet. He was a decent 3-point shooter in college. He also started the season injured and didn’t get into Houston’s rotation until much later in the season. So I think Thorp’s opinion is simply that Monroe had the better season, but he thinks Patterson will be better along the way.

          I like Patterson a lot actually. He plays a lot like Antonio McDyess did after his knee injuries. Good spot up shooter, solid defender, solid rebounder. I don’t know that he’ll be better than Monroe, but he might be.

        • Apr 15, 20112:43 pm
          by Tim

          Reply

          Of course it does. It’s all about potential versus readiness. Kind of like how most people thought (correctly) that even though Emeka Okafor was better than Dwight Howard as a rookie, Howard had a brighter future. Monroe has decent potential. but I believe his ceiling is an Al Horford caliber player–which would be nothing to complain about. I don’t think Patterson’s ceiling is any higher, but Cousins’ is definitely much higher. He has more upside than Stoudemire.
          I get what you are saying. But I don’t think most people think that Patterson is very polished. He’s not super raw, but nor is Monroe. And Monroe certainly was given a lot more opportunity that Patterson as a rookie. So that is where having more potential to get better comes from. So I agree with you, except that I can sort of see where Thorpe is coming from.

  • Apr 15, 20118:45 am
    by Steve K

    Reply

    It seems that Thorpe sees a higher ceiling for those other guys because Monroe doesn’t wow with his athleticism? Hard to say.
     
    While their games aren’t terribly similar, Monroe’s approach is similar to Tim Duncan. He won’t bring the house down with a thunder dunk like Griffin (or Cousins). But he’s obviously improved on multiple aspects of his game right before our eyes. It’s that commitment to improving and helping the team win that proves his value.
     
    If he was more flashy, maybe he’d win more awards. Either way, I’m sure the Pistons are comfortable exactly how he is.

  • Apr 15, 201110:22 am
    by Owey

    Reply

    Monroe is a better passer and rebounder this year than Patterson will ever be. Plus his growth tripled Patterson’s.  Its that simple.

    • Apr 15, 201111:58 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      It’s not that simple at all. Monroe played almost three times as many minutes as Patterson. I agree wholeheartedly that Monroe grew immensely this season, but Patterson played in a much better frontcourt with Brad Miller, Scola and Chuck Hayes in front of him than Monroe did. When Patterson finally broke into the rotation, he produced. He just wasn’t in a position where he could earn as big a role as Monroe could.

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    Reply

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