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Detroit Pistons can sign-and-trade Rodney Stuckey this summer

In a recent mailbag, Keith Langlois explained that the Pistons can’t sign-and-trade Rodney Stuckey.

Ben (Lansing, Mich.): I’m confused as to whether the Pistons could negotiate a sign and trade for Rodney Stuckey due to his status as a restricted free agent. Is that possible?

Langlois: Not under the current CBA, which won’t be in effect when Stuckey becomes a restricted free agent on July 1, regardless. Under current rules, it works like this: Stuckey puts himself on the market as a RFA. If he can entice somebody to offer him a contract he finds suitable, he signs an offer sheet. The Pistons would then have a week to match. But they can’t match it and trade him. In fact, if Stuckey signs an offer sheet and the Pistons match, they can’t trade him for one full year without his consent – and they could not trade him to the team that extends the offer sheet for a year, regardless of consent. If Stuckey did not agree to another team’s offer sheet, as best I interpret the CBA, once he were to re-sign with the Pistons, he could then be traded no earlier than Dec. 15. But, again, the new CBA figures to alter the rules across the board.

Ben from Lansing is actually Ben Gulker, who re-posted the explanation on Detroit Bad Boys. Because this notion that the Pistons can’t sign-and-trade Stuckey has been gaining traction, I want to clear up the actual situation:

The Pistons can sign-and-trade Rodney Stuckey this summer, assuming the relevant portions of the Collective Bargaining Agreement remain unchanged.

Of course, anything can change in the new CBA, but I don’t expect any rules that apply here to be altered. Everything in this post uses the current CBA.

The first step this summer will be the Pistons deciding whether to extend Stuckey a qualifying offer.

If they do, Stuckey will become a restricted free agent (meaning the Pistons can match any offer sheet he signs). Until the Pistons or Stuckey do something else, Stuckey will have the option to sign a one-year $3,868,443 contract with Detroit. When that contract expires, he’d be an unrestricted free agent.

If the Pistons don’t extend the qualifying offer, he’d become an unrestricted free agent.

The Pistons are virtual locks to extend Stuckey a qualifying offer, so here are the four scenarios that could happen after that point:

The Pistons can re-sign Rodney Stuckey

This is the simplest option. The Pistons could present Stuckey a contract, and he could sign it.

If that occurs, the Pistons couldn’t trade Stuckey until Dec. 15 (or three months after he signs, whichever is later).

Rodney Stuckey can accept the Pistons’ qualifying offer

As described above, as long as the Pistons want to retain their ability to match an offer sheet to Stuckey, they must leave a one-year, $3,868,443 contract on the table for him.

If he accepts that contract, Detroit can’t trade him without his consent during the deal.

Rodney Stuckey can sign an offer sheet with another team

If Stuckey signs an offer sheet with another team, the Pistons would have seven days to match. Regardless, of whether they do or not, they can’t match-and-trade him.

For one year after the Pistons match, Stuckey would have the right to refuse any trade. However, the Pistons couldn’t trade him to the team that originally signed him during that one-year period.

Rodney Stuckey and the Pistons can agree to a sign-and-trade

A sign-and-trade is a single transaction, and the Pistons could sign-trade Stuckey this summer. Detroit, Stuckey and the team acquiring him would have to agree to all the terms.

Once Stuckey signs any contract or offer sheet that’s not explicitly a sign-and-trade, a sign-and-trade is impossible.

21 Comments

  • Apr 12, 20114:20 pm
    by TealBurgundyBlackGold

    Reply

    It will suck to let him walk, but it would seem even more strange to sign him this year and count down the days until he can be traded.  He has done what he has wanted far too many times, with two different coaches here in Detroit and once Rip and Tay are gone it will be his team – encouraging him only more to be insubordinate.
     
    It will take a major culture change to save Rodney Stuckey’s career in Detroit.  I would think a new GM would have to be brought in, one who isn’t in love with him – to instill a fear in Stucks that he can’t do whatever he wants.

  • Apr 12, 20117:16 pm
    by steve - battle creek

    Reply

    they have to have cap space to sign and trade stuckey.  even if they renounce him they still will not have enough cap space to sign and trade him at his expected salary of 7-9mil a year.

    • Apr 12, 20117:50 pm
      by Dan Feldman

      Reply

      Steve, that’s incorrect. The Pistons have Stuckey’s bird rights, meaning they can go over the salary cap to sign him, even in a sign-and-trade.

      • Apr 12, 20118:27 pm
        by steve - battle creek

        Reply

        not true Dan, the pistons to sign and trade stuckey, he has to be an unrestricted free agent.  For him to become an unrestricted free agent the pistons have to renounce him, thus he gives up his bird rights.
        this is actually how we signed charlie v from the bucks, he had bird rights with bucks, but there was a cap hold for him, when they renounced (to get his cap hold off there books) he became ufa and they could not go over cap to sign him.
         
         

        • Apr 13, 20118:00 am
          by Ben

          Reply

          I don’t think that’s right.  He becomes a restricted free agent when the Pistons extend the qualifying offer. Stucky then has three options:
           

          Sign the qualifying offer
          Sign with another team, with the Pistons having the right to match,
          Sign with the Pistons (for something other than the qualifying offer).

          In scenarios 1 and 2, the Pistons can’t trade him for a year w/o consent. But there’s nothing to keep them from doing a sign-and-trade in scenario 3. Thus, no unrestricted free agency, no renunciation necessary, and Bird rights still apply.

          Meanwhile this whole discussion is a bit silly; see below.

           

          • Apr 13, 20112:42 pm
            by Dan Feldman

            Ben, I think you’re on the right track. I just want to clarify one thing. If the Pistons sign-and-trade Stuckey, that has to be agreed upon at the time of the signing. They can’t sign him, then work out a sign-and-trade later.

  • Apr 12, 20118:11 pm
    by steve - battle creek

    Reply

    not true Dan, the pistons to sign and trade stuckey, he has to be an unrestricted free agent.  For him to become an unrestricted free agent the pistons have to renounce him, thus he gives up his bird rights.

    • Apr 13, 20112:28 pm
      by Dan Feldman

      Reply

      Steve, Stuckey does not have to become an unrestricted free agent for him to be part of a sign-and-trade. I logically can’t prove that a rule that doesn’t exist, in fact, doesn’t exist. So, I’ll put the onus on you to prove that the rule exists. Here’s a head start:

      http://members.cox.net/lmcoon/salarycap.htm#Q79

  • Apr 12, 20118:15 pm
    by steve - battle creek

    Reply

    this is actually how we signed charlie v from the bucks, he had bird rights with bucks, but there was a cap hold for him, when they renounced (to get his cap hold off there books) he became ufa and they could not go over cap to sign him.

  • Apr 12, 20118:22 pm
    by detroitpcb

    Reply

    Man, what is that garbage Teal writes. Stuckey has game, has skills, has a desire to win, and was frustrated with what he correctly sees as incompetence in the head coaching chair. Does Stuck have things he needs to work on in his game? Sure. bUT HE SHOWED THE ABILITY TO HIT THE THREE THIS YEAR WHICH HIS CRITICS HAVE ALWAYS TALKED ABOUT. HE SHOWED THE ABILITY TO HIT THE OPEN MIDRANGE SHOT AT A DECENT PERCENTAGE. HE CONTINUES TO SHOW THE ABILITY TO GET TO THE LINE. He showed he can pass. His decision making needs to get better.  But his relationship with Q is not an issue that should have anything to do with resining Stuckey. Deciding whether the Pistons want to play at a faster pace is a factor.

    i mean, if Q is back next year nobody is going to watch that mess.

    • Apr 12, 20119:04 pm
      by TealBurgundyBlackGold

      Reply

      Stuckey has REALLY strong talent.  Stuckey also has a very strong sense of entitlement. His NBA tutelage has been this:  Saunders’ final year, where after a good showing in his rookie campaign they made him the PG. Michael Curry for one year, where he began to learn from Rip and Tayshaun that just because there’s an inexperienced coach, you don’t have to do what you want.  Now, year to of coach Q, not only did he see more and more of it – he has participated in it quite a bit.
      Stuckey has made improvement, yes, but enough to let him hold this team hostage?  Because IF it is Joe D who resigns him, what does Stuckey have to prove?  He will have done things you just don’t do as a player, no matter who your coach is, nor who your teammates are.  He will have been resigned by a GM who has openly said he is the future of the Pistons. Stuckey will no doubt get paid, and be a good player, but unless there is a MAJOR culture change here I do not think Stuckey can be brought back considering we already have a fair share of long-term money invested (and supposedly want Prince back too).
       

    • Apr 13, 20112:23 pm
      by Tim

      Reply

      I actually am among those who hope that Detroit retains Stuckey. Although, to be honest, I certainly wouldn’t be devastated if they didn’t. But it is absurd to say that this year Stuckey has shown the ability to hit threes. Here are his last three seasons of 3 point shooting: 23-78, 18-79, 25-87. Stuckey is at a career high 1.3 3 point attempts per game (but that’s not really much more than 1.0 or 1.1). But he is still shooting them at under 30 percent. That is terrible. Conclusion: 3 point shooting is not part of Stuckey’s game to date.
      As for everything else. He has again this season shown incremental improvement in his game. But he has shown no more ability than he did two or three yeas ago. And he has shown only the tiniest bit more tendency to use his big time ability.

  • Apr 13, 201112:08 am
    by BIG MARV

    Reply

    DONT DRINK THE KOOL AID! DONT DRINK THE KOOL AID! DONT DRINK THE KOOL AID! if you get him on the cheap keep him, if not let him go and if you resign him you better damn sure put him at SG he’s done at PG hes a scorer not a passer or set up man

  • Apr 13, 20118:09 am
    by Ben

    Reply

    All of this is beside the point, no? If Stuckey signs a qualifying offer, or signs with another team and the Pistons match, the Pistons can’t trade him for a year without his consent. But sign-and-trades *always* need the player’s consent. There’s nothing new here.
    If the Pistons sign him and want to trade him during the season, then the restricted free agency trading rules would matter. But for a sign-and-trade? Irrelevant. You need his consent either way.

    • Apr 13, 20112:48 pm
      by Dan Feldman

      Reply

      Ben, interesting point, but a couple reasons why this does matter:

      1. If Stuckey signs an offer sheet that the Pistons match, they can’t trade him to the team Stuckey originally signed with. A sign-and-trade before Stuckey signs the offer sheet would be the only way to send Stuckey to that team.

      2. If Stuckey accepts the qualifying offer or the Pistons match another offer, the Pistons can’t trade Stuckey until Dec. 15 (or three months after he accepts the QO/the Pistons match). A sign-and-trade would allow him to join his new team significantly sooner.

  • Apr 13, 20118:12 am
    by Ben

    Reply

    With the sole proviso that they can’t match a contract, and then sign-and-trade him to the team that made the offer.

    • Apr 13, 20112:51 pm
      by Dan Feldman

      Reply

      Ah, just saw this comment. Still, the second reason above matters more.

  • Apr 13, 201110:26 am
    by Steve K

    Reply

    I’m not gonna waste any more thought on Stuckey and his “talent.” Yes, he has NBA-level talent and may improve, but will that translate to wins?
     
    In Rick Carlisle’s first season – the start of most recent Piston run of excellence – the Pistons’ starting 5 was:
    - Stackhouse
    - Cliffy
    - Ben Wallace
    - Michael Curry
    - Dana Barros
     
    There’s not a ton of “talent” on that team. What they did have was chemistry and an identity, based on Big Ben’s ability to dominate the paint.
     
    If the Pistons are to get back to an elite level, they need to figure out an identity. Are they run-and-gun? Defense-first? If Stuckey fits in that plan, great. If not, let him go. There are plenty of way-cheaper guards in the league.

  • May 12, 20118:14 pm
    by JR Maness

    Reply

    Would you guys be interested in a Felton for Rodney Stuckey sign and trade

    • May 13, 20119:53 am
      by brgulker

      Reply

      I can’t speak for everyone, but I would be. Felton’s a better PG, and he’s only on contract for one more season should things not work out. Perhaps Denver would bite given JR Smith’s (seemingly inevitable) departure?

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