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Spahn, Sain and a loss to the Spurs

There’s an old baseball saying – “Spahn, Sain and pray for rain.”  The 1948 Boston Braves weren’t a very good team top-to-bottom, but they had two star starting pitchers: Warren Spahn and Johnny Sain. When those two started, the Braves would probably win. Otherwise, they had to pray for rain, giving Spahn and Sain more opportunities to start.

The Pistons don’t typically have a Spahn or a Sain. Remarkably, they gave themselves the upper hand in two major areas against the Spurs tonight, anyway. That left the Pistons praying for rain to complete a win over San Antonio, which holds the NBA’s best record.

Unfortunately, they hit a drought.

The Pistons worked the two advantages they had tonight – Will Bynum’s shiftiness and John Kuester’s gameplan for defending Tim Duncan – but everything else* dried up in a 100-89 loss. Frankly, the Pistons had no business staying close. The Spurs haven’t lost to a team with a record as poor as the Pistons’ all season.

But Bynum (21 points on 9-of-13 shooting) worked his way around the Spurs’ excellent half-court defense. He found paths to the basket and blasted through them before San Antonio could rotate. He dribbled all over the court, and with an ability to stop on a dime, he pulled up for under-control jumpers while Tony Parker leaned the other way.

And Kuester wisely allowed Tim Duncan freedom to shoot from outside, keeping Detroit’s bigs in the paint to rebound Duncan’s misses. Duncan shot just 3-of-10 – taking shots from 7, 20, 0, 16, 7, 5, 22, 20, 17, and 9 feet. That’s far from a typical distribution for him. And the Pistons rebounded six of Duncan’s seven misses. Credit Kuester for scheming away one of the Spurs’ biggest offensive advantages.

Still, Spahn and Sain – or Bynum and Kuester, in this case – couldn’t make up for the desert that was the rest of of the team

*Greg Monroe (14 points and 13 rebounds) is exempt. But he’s quickly becoming old dependable for the Pistons. He’s going to get 10-and-10 or so every game.

The Pistons’ top offensive threats couldn’t make shots. Four of the Pistons’ five leaders in attempts combined to shoot 16-of-50.*

*Tracy McGrady shot 3-of-10. Tayshaun Prince shot 5-of-15. Ben Gordon shot 4-of-13. Rodney Stuckey shot 4-of-12.

Detroit’s bigs couldn’t prevent DeJuan Blair (18 points and 12 rebounds) from dominating Detroit inside. I take that back. Joe Dumars could have stopped him by drafting him instead of creating the “DaJuan … Summers” fakeout in the second round of the 2009 draft. But no current Piston could stop Blair tonight.

Bynum couldn’t keep Tony Parker (19 points on 7-of-8 shooting and seven assists) out of the paint.

The Pistons couldn’t rotate quick enough to keep Manu Ginobili, Matt Bonner, Ginobili (again), Richard Jefferson and Steve Novak from hitting 3-points down the stretch.

In the end, this game was about what the Pistons couldn’t do, not what they could. But let’s talk about what the Pistons have done.

Entering the game, everyone game them a shot. They’re no longer pushovers, and they fought San Antonio most of the night. Detroit is building credibility, and tonight’s loss only adds to it. A win would have been nice, though.

If only it had rained.

43 Comments

  • Feb 8, 201111:04 pm
    by detroitpcb

    Reply

    it is so easy to praise Bynum after a shooting night like this but……….does anyone else want to see an offense and not a one on one display. Bynum should take some lessons from the Spurs. That penetrate – kick out offense they run is beautiful. Bynum has a great three point shooter in Daye on the court if he would ever look to get him the ball off penetration. But i guess that is too much to ask from a back up point guard.

    and what the hell was Max doing in this game? Where was Wilcox? Is he hurt?

    • Feb 9, 20119:14 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      See, I reject the notion that Bynum’s role with this team is to come in and run a beautiful halfcourt offense. He’s not that kind of player, first of all.

      But more importantly, his greatest strengths are his energy and quickness. His role is to come into the game and make it chaotic. Now, sometimes this backfires and he takes and misses bad shots or turns it over too much and generally plays out of control. But sometimes, he scores points in bunches and he keeps the Pistons competitive in games they really shouldn’t be that competitive in (for example, with every other guard on the roster struggling last night, the Pistons had no business taking the Spurs down to the wire, but they did because Bynum was exceptional in what he is good at doing).

      He’s probably a 9th or 10th best player on a good team. He’s paid very reasonably, even if his game has flaws. It’s silly to nitpick what he isn’t. We know what he isn’t. But what he is is a pretty fun player to watch and one who can come off the bench and swing the momentum of a game in your favor.

      • Feb 9, 201111:33 am
        by Laser

        Reply

        well, hayes, we’re in agreement here. seems weird to complain about the guy considering his contract, role, and overall production for this team. he’d probably be a great spark off the bench, instant offense kind of guy who can distribute too on basically any team. not sure there’s a backup PG in the league i’d rather have. but i’d sure like to have a traditional PG in front of him.

  • Feb 8, 201111:17 pm
    by detroitpcb

    Reply

    Bynum played 24 minutes and had 2 assists.

    and yes, Joe Dumars should have drafted Blair even if he has structurally unsound knees.

  • Feb 8, 201111:46 pm
    by jgk281

    Reply

    Another joke of a coaching job. Maxiell in the game with 5 min left in the 4th? WTF?

    idk why he was even playing at all. He was out of the rotation for good because he sucks, so they decide to bring him back against the best team in the league?

    What, were the saving him for the Spurs all this time? LOL!

    Its funny because before the game I said, I bet Maxiell is going to play tonight because Blair is a similar type of player, but I was being 100% sarcastic. I didn’t think Kuester was that dumb to think Maxiell could match up with Blair just because they are the same size.

    Not to mention the stretches where Maxiell was guarding Duncan. SMH

    Then, you got Will Bynum running free like a rabid squirel with no discipline whatsoever, or any kind of team offense at all.

    I know Pop would’nt have allowed that, but Kuester just rolls the ball out and whichever player gets his hands on it the most, gets the most shots I guess.

    Its obvious ‘Mr. Selfish’ Will Bynum was trying to show off for Gores. I hope Gores has enough sense to see right through him.

    My hope is that Gores takes over, and cleans house from top to bottom, everyone except Monroe and Jerebko, and starts over from scratch.

    Gets a new GM and Coach, and puts a team together the right way.

    I’m so tired of these inconsistent, selfish players Joe has acquired, as well as  all of his bad contracts he’s accumulated, and all of his dumb coaches he’s hired.

    The Dumars Era was great when it worked, but its not working anymore, and its time for a new era.

    • Feb 9, 201112:44 am
      by Laser

      Reply

      get real. you sound ridiculous. t-mac got the start and logged more minutes than bynum and got just one extra assist while shooting 3 for 10. meanwhile bynum shot 9 for 13 for 21 points on a night when the team collectively shot 43.4%. stop being ridiculous. complain about something other than one of the best two pistons on the floor. i’m all about running an actual offense instead of isolation plays, but you just love picking the wrong nights to bash bynum. so, uh, get real? please??

    • Feb 9, 20112:17 am
      by bg8

      Reply

      why maxiel was playing, because kuester started wallace and monroe and wilcox is probably injured again. thats probably why wallace and monroe should not start, you start one of them with either cv or daye and have the other come off the bench. you can’t really start both wallace and monroe because kuester is too stupid to realize that he could take players out earlier like at the 5-6min mark of the first and let them back in at the begining of the 2nd.

      thats really what he should be doing with the backcourt, it should be a 3man rotation, stuck, bg, tmac, two of them could play the point (i would say all 3 could play the point), and there should always be 2 of bg, stuck, tmac, or prince on the court at all time, but again kuester is too stupid to do this since he prefer to do mass changes or couple of changes in a minute.

    • Feb 9, 20119:17 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      This is over the top.

      Maxiell played because Wilcox is injured and Wallace and Monroe can’t play 48 minutes each. Charlie Villanueva is playing but he’s injured as well. Austin Daye certainly isn’t able to slide down to the four vs. the Spurs frontline. They really had no choice but to play Maxiell.

      And to criticize Bynum after it was his energy and efficient shooting that kept the team in the game is pretty silly. Yeah, his game is not perfect. But he’s an end of the bench type player who gives energy. Last night, he happened to be giving a ton of energy and had his shot working. Minus Bynum, the Pistons probably lose that game by 20 or more.

      • Feb 9, 201111:42 am
        by Laser

        Reply

        also, i know +/- isn’t always a useful stat, but max was the only piston who had a positive efficiency rating. usually when this happens for someone at the end of the bench, it’s because he played garbage minutes. but max was in there in crunch time, so that number is probably significant.
         
        and hayes, let me take this opportunity to point this out: you seem to have some kind of irrational problem with me. meanwhile there are so many jokers who come here and ACTUALLY ramble incoherently, or point the finger at fringe rotation players as the reason for losing games the team had no business being in but for contributions from those guys. i don’t get it. if you don’t want to read my wordy comments, don’t read them. i’m confident i regularly contribute to the dialogue here. i’m not sure how anyone could have quite the problem with me that you seem to.

  • Feb 8, 201111:52 pm
    by jgk281

    Reply

    btw, our jump-shot happy perimeter of Gordon, Stuckey, Prince, and McGrady shot 16-50!

    Meanwhile, Monroe was 5-9 and outscored all of them.

    So WTF did Monroe only get 9 shots, and the others 50???

    How could any coach in their right mind give 41 more shots to those 4, when they were bricking everything, and Monroe was making every other shot?

    Just pathetic coaching at its worst.

    • Feb 9, 201112:47 am
      by Laser

      Reply

      also, charlie played just 12.5 minutes and took 3 shots, making 2 for 5 points. granted this team presents a bad matchup for him, but that goes for plenty of teams. this nicely illustrates the problem with charlie v.

      • Feb 9, 20119:22 am
        by Patrick Hayes

        Reply

        Villanueva is also not 100 percent healthy. I would guess that also contributed to him not playing much.

        • Feb 9, 201111:50 am
          by Laser

          Reply

          true, but i feel like this happens all the time. this guy just hasn’t been a consistent performer for us. problem is, you either treat him like your third or fourth big man and don’t lean on him too much, and he seems to defer too much and have 15 minute, 5 point performances (even when healthy). but he’s too inconsistent and unreliable to lean heavily on him and treat him like a major piece, even though he’s paid like a cornerstone. i’d move him in an instant if i could. i’d move most of this team in an instant.
           
          we really should at least start with one or two legitimate building block type players and build from there, even if it means gutting this roster of all its mediocre talent. if zach randolph wants to come here (and there are other available front line FA upgrades if he goes elsewhere), how do you not clear some cap space. we have zero players you can hang your hat on, and the guys who are absolutely 100% worth keeping are the guys who don’t cost you any flexibility (monroe, daye, jj).

    • Feb 9, 20119:19 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Did you see Monroe getting his shots by posting guys up? He shot so well because he moves without the ball and he’s in good position to catch it after the guards get penetration.

      I love Monroe as much as anyone, but if you’re giving him the ball in the post vs. Duncan and Blair and expecting him to back them down and create his own shots, well, you’re gonna lose.

    • Feb 9, 20119:30 am
      by Jason

      Reply

      All while RIP rotted on the bench, after coming off a fairly solid night for being his first in game in weeks……………………….
       

      • Feb 9, 20119:38 am
        by Patrick Hayes

        Reply

        Jason:

        Rip sat out because he reportedly injured his groin late in the Milwaukee game. It was an injury DNP, not a coach’s decision. I have a hunch he probably would’ve played considering Gordon, Stuckey and Prince all played so poorly.

        • Feb 9, 201111:58 am
          by Laser

          Reply

          i doubt it. in fact, i’d bet money against it. kuester seemed to say as much with his “simple math” blurb. and we had nights after rip’s benching where all our perimeter players shot the ball like garbage and they never considered going to hamilton. caputo was griping about this, which is why it stands out. but the thing is, having all these “weapons” at one position has proven to be a bad thing. it’s nice to think that you can just ride the hot hand (and between rip and gordon, it’s a wonder you can’t even get even one of them going on some nights), but we’ve seen more than enough of that formula to know it doesn’t work. it’s a very slippery slope when you start calling rip’s number on nights the other guys don’t have it going. how long do you ride these guys? everyone rightly complained that we couldn’t get guys in a rhythm with such a big rotation, and the team’s overall play has been noticeably better since we cut out a SG. as i’ve said before, we need to trade one of them badly. but i’d still limit the rotation to two SGs.

  • [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Patrick Hayes, PistonPowered Feed. PistonPowered Feed said: Spahn, Sain and a loss to the Spurs: There’s an old baseball saying – “Spahn, Sain and pray for rain.”  The 1948… http://bit.ly/f1zxYy [...]

  • Feb 9, 201112:38 am
    by Fennis

    Reply

    Will Bynum hates passing. I don’t know why, not sure how he became a pg, but I am certain that he hates the act of releasing the ball from his hands and directing the ball to the vicinity of a team. He loathes it. Passing offends his nature. Please someone, anyone defuse the Bynumite.
     
    I find myself actually cringing when Bynum makes back-to-back shots because I know we’re in some really sloppy basketball. And, as mentioned above, Kuester buys into it every single time! He’s isos Will Bynum (or sets up the utterly terrifying Will/Maxiell pick and roll) like he used LBJ in Cleveland. Will Bynum has tons of talent, and can even adequately run the team in stretches, but when he gets a couple through the hole the rest of the night is going to be about him. Good coaches don’t let that happen. Kudos to Kuester and the gameplan. I am very pleased that the team is competing with the best squads in the NBA. If we had played like this from jump street I think we’d have at least a .500 record. But get some cahones and reign in Will the Thrill.
     
    Circus shots cannot be the foundation of a sound offense. And I totally agree with the sentiment about Daye, who is one of the few guys consistently taking the right shot and making the right pass. He’s getting passed over left and right on wild drives by the guards and bad shots by the wings. T-Mac, Stuck, and Prince were all guilty of repeatedly taking bad shots tonight. I honestly believe that Will Bynum’s style of play is contagious, in no small part due to the fact that he is the *point guard* and other guys rely on him to get shots. I just hope Daye and Monroe don’t take on the veterans’ bad habits and regress from team basketball.

    • Feb 9, 201112:58 am
      by Laser

      Reply

      the shoot-first point guard has been an absolute institution here since chauncey left town. it’s not remotely specific to bynum. dude made over 2/3 of his shots when hardly anyone else could buy a bucket. you’re probably right about bynum hitting back-to-back shots and deciding it’s a shooting night for him, but the guy was very efficient tonight. being a point guard isn’t only about facilitating; it’s about knowing when to pass and when to shoot and feeding the hot hand. tonight will happened to be the hot hand.
       
      the pistons had no hope in hell of getting a win tonight. somehow the best perimeter player on the floor for us was the problem. i guess we should have stuck with t-mac, stuckey, gordon and prince.

    • Feb 9, 20119:26 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Wow. I don’t understand all of the Bynum rip-jobs. Seriously, how was he gonna rack up assists last night? Gordon/Stuckey/Prince/McGrady shot like 30 percent combined. I mean, this is one of the complaints that drove me nuts about Stuckey at PG too. “His assist totals are low!” Look at the shooting percentages of teammates, which have been down the last two years, and that’ll explain partially why your PG has lower assist totals.

      Bynum was the ONLY GUARD ON THE TEAM last night who was successfully creating his own shot. He kept the Pistons in a game they would not have been competitive in without him due to the struggles of the aforementioned players. Bynum was not the problem!

  • Feb 9, 20111:02 am
    by Laser

    Reply

    guys… god knows what we’d do without gordon and stuckey, right? 4-13 and 4-12, combining for 3 assists and 3 turns. rip can’t be counted on to produce like that. he’s too old!
     
    come on, who’s with me?

    • Feb 9, 20119:27 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      It’s hard to play a guy who sits out due to injury.

      • Feb 9, 20119:38 am
        by Jason

        Reply

        RIP was injured last night?

      • Feb 9, 201112:03 pm
        by Laser

        Reply

        rip is not going to play as long as stuckey and gordon are healthy, because he’s the third SG on the depth chart. it’s “simple math,” remember?
         
        i wasn’t saying rip would have helped tonight. i was saying that gordon and stuckey routinely have nights like this. rip has too, but i don’t think you’re going to see such a significant drop-off if you trade one of the other guys and move rip up the depth chart that you’d sacrifice any flexibility whatsoever and miss out on free agents who can help significantly.

  • Feb 9, 20111:26 am
    by jgk281

    Reply

    All I know is somethings wrong with the game-plan when your back-up PG gets 4 more FG attempts than your starting Center, and the same amount of assists.

    Does Bynum not know that he is the bench player and Monroe is the starter?

    It feels backwards when they are in together.

    • Feb 9, 20119:29 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Monroe doesn’t create his own shot, and he certainly wasn’t going to magically start doing it against arguably the best frontcourt in the league. He’s reliant on others to draw the defense and kick. He’s not a major low post presence yet. And honestly, he wasn’t a big time low post presence in college either. He takes and makes high percentage shots created by others. That’s great for now. But to expect that we can just toss him the ball vs. Duncan, Blair or McDyess and think he’s going to have any success backing them down and scoring consistently is crazy.

  • Feb 9, 20111:34 am
    by jgk281

    Reply

    Monroe’s last 5 games, he’s shooting 65% from the field (28-43) avg 13 pts, 11 rebs, 2 asts, and 1 blk/gm.

    If Gordon, Bynum or one of the perimeter players were shooting that percentage, all we’d hear from the Pistons is how they need to continue to ride the hot hand. Yet, for whatever reason, because its Monroe, he only gets 9 shots.

    This team is perimeter-biased, and I cant stand it.

    Then, they’ll wine about how they dont have an inside presence. When your starting center has those kind of numbers, that qualifies as inside presence, as far as I’m concerned.

    Not that they should start running plays for him in the low post, but they could be running pick and rolls and penetrate and dish plays for him, WAY more than they are. They are not taking full advantage of what he could provide this team, and I blame Kuester first and foremost.

    • Feb 9, 20119:30 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      He’s a presence on the boards and around the baskt. But there’s a big difference between an “inside presence” which he is, and a “post presence,” which he isn’t just yet. He’ll get there. But that part of his game was behind coming out of college.

  • Feb 9, 20111:58 am
    by bg8

    Reply

    well the way i see it, reason why monroe don’t get more shot is because he can’t really shoot the ball that well, and his post moves isn’t all that great. i could be wrong about his post moves, but from what i remember, most of monroe baskets are either tip back or having someone drive to the basket and drop it off to him for an easy basket. that could be a reason why monroe doesn’t shoot as much since he seems to always need someone to create for him, he can’t really do it on his own. i don’t know, just maybe.

    and i guess i should add in my little bg comment, should’ve gotten more minutes, and most definitely should’ve gotten up more shots. knew the pistons was gonna lose when bynum started hitting his shots early in the 4th, why, cause there was no chance for bg to come back in, again why, cause kuester’s an idiot and got bg in term of hierarchy, behind daye, prince, tmac, stucky, which is just ridiculous

    • Feb 9, 20119:31 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      You’re right on Monroe. He doesn’t yet have a fully developed post game, and since they were playing a team that plays the best post defense in the league, it’s crazy for people to think he was going to suddenly become Moses Malone or something.

      • Feb 9, 20115:04 pm
        by jgk281

        Reply

        I wasnt at all suggesting that they throw it in to Monroe in the post and tell him to go to work against Tim Duncan. I was suggesting that they run more of the stuff that he can be succesful at, like pick and rolls, penetrate and dish type of plays.

        It seems like he converts inside almost everytime they run something like that, and you would think they would’ve run more than 9 plays like that in a game where the 4 main G/F’s went 16-50 from the field. At some point before they reached 50, you would think Kuester would’ve said, ‘ok we need to get the ball inside somehow, these jump-shots aren’t working’, and then recognized that Monroe had been pretty effective scoring inside on those types of plays, thus ran more of them.

        Thats all I was saying. Whether they are set plays or not, they are effective. When the guards are communicating with him and looking for him inside off penetration and pick and rolls, it works. So I dont know why they dont do it more often is my point.

        If they aren’t set plays, then I blame Kuester even more for not recognizing that they work, and turning them into set plays.

        Even if Monroe misses inside, at least it give the defense something else to defend, instead of dribble, dribble, jump-shot every time down. And one of Monroes greatest strengths is offensive rebounding and put-backs, so if he can just get the ball inside and put it up, there’s a good chance he can get a tip in, even if he misses.

        I just think they are under-utilizing him, and could be getting much more production out of him, scoring-wise, if they got a little creative and made an effort to get him shots at the basket, rather than focusing everything on plays for the G/F’s.

        Its not like he’s shooting 40%, he’s at 65% over his last 5 games, and until he goes cold, I think he should continue to get more and more shots every game, and let him prove that he cant convert at that rate with more shots, rather than just assume that he wont.

  • Feb 9, 20118:43 am
    by Steve K

    Reply

    I disagree on the Bynum not passing thing. I’ve seen be a more-than-willing passer when better options present themselves.
     
    More often than not, though, he’s the best scorer on the floor. When he’s hot, he’s tough for anybody to stop. He did make a fine dish to Monroe late in the 4th, with the game within reach. Monroe rebounded his missed shot and found a teammate streaking down the lane. Unfortunately, for the Pistons and their fans, that teammate was Stuckey – who’s had well-documented struggles on finishing at the rim. Stuckey somehow missed the point-blank lay-in, Jefferson hit a clutch 3 on the other end, and the game was over. If Stuckey makes that lay-in, the Pistons at least have a shot, down 4 with 2 minutes left. Not likely, but possible.

    • Feb 9, 20119:34 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Yeah, I don’t think Bynum is an unwilling passer either. He’s certainly not a fantastic passer, but if someone is open, he gets it to them.

      Last night though, his offense was working. He shot 9-for-13 and only turned it over twice in 23 minutes and people are acting like he was some inefficient monster who cost the Pistons the game last night! Sorry, but if I’m coaching a guy  who is shooting that well and who is getting to the basket and finishing against the best team in the league, I’m letting him go. There are certainly nights when Bynum has hurt the team by being overly aggressive, but last night wasn’t one of them. They needed his aggression and they certainly needed his scoring.

  • Feb 9, 20119:14 am
    by detroitpcb

    Reply

    Monroe gets his points off movement without the ball after setting screens and from position on the offensive glass. I do not recall more than one play being ran for Monroe all season.

    what irks me the most is when Bynum is in the game, the ball never reverses. Never. It is a team game and you have to use all your players and the whole floor, not half of it.

    Laser has a valid point – Gordon & Stuckey did not shoot well. You can blame Stuckey’s missed layups on “rust” as Q did, or you can blame it on Stuckey usually only having one gear when he goes to the basket – which is fast on the verge of out of control.

    Gordon has more games like this than he does the occasional hot game when his shot is going. Plus he turns the ball over, and plays marginal defense – he actually plays ok D until he sees a screen – but then its bye bye Ben. Don’t know if he is scared to take a shot like Stuckey took from Melo or whether he is too bulky and slow of foot, or whether he never learned proper footwork – but he is pitiful on the screen and roll – and being paired with T-Mac that is all he is going to see all night long since there is no way T-Mac can guard the opposing points.

    Bynum goes in the air everytime before he passes – which is why half the time the he turns the ball over or the ball goes out-of-bounds. Wasn’t that the first thing your junior high coach taught you about passing: don’t get caught in the air? But the main thing is, he doesn’t look for other people. Will is a scorer – that’s what he does. He does not run the offense. He does not penetrate and kick. He scores. On nights when his shot is falling and he finishes his drives, he looks great and the Pistons lose. On nights when his shot is not falling and he makes turnovers and gets blocked at the rack the Pistons lose.

    Both Monroe and Daye are very intelligent basketball players who play team ball. We need to get rid of guys like Bynum who don’t.

    And at this point i don’t care who they trade: Stuckey, Gordon, or Rip. My own preference would be to keep Stuckey and trade both Rip and Gordon but that is not going to happen.

    • Feb 9, 20119:36 am
      by Patrick Hayes

      Reply

      Bynum is fine in the role he plays. Games like last night, he’s capable of taking over when most others on the team shot it poorly. Some games, he’s too aggressive or missing too many shots, so you simply don’t play him as much.

      For the small amount (by NBA standards) that he’s signed for, he’s worth having on the bench. Very few bench players can come in and affect the energy level and tempo of the game on the second unit the way he can. He’s valuable, just stop expecting him to be a halfcourt PG who always makes the smart play.

  • Feb 9, 20119:42 am
    by Jason

    Reply

    All this knocking Bynum is ridiculous. Partick said it best, he (& Monroe) are the only reason the Pistons were even in the game for the bulk of it.
     
    I jut want to point out, at one point, Bynum throws down a Highlight reel type of dunk – we steal the inbound pass, Bynum passes to Stuck, then calls for it back (Clearly feeling his shot/rhythm after the monster dunk) – and Stuck decides to dribble in circles, and jack up a 20′ contested shot that misses badly.
    Of course it was only one play – but it just epitomized what Stuckey tends to do to this offense. Feed the hot hands, that happened to be Bynum/Monroe last night…
     
    On a bright note, how sweet is it to see Monroe consistently play well, and put up big numbers against teams like the Spurs? Its one things to have good stat lines against weak teams, but when as a rookie you are hanging with one of the best front court’s in the league, it’s such a promising sign for the future.
     
    This I hope is something we can ALL agree on!

  • Feb 9, 201110:01 am
    by Steve K

    Reply

    Just want to comment briefly on DF’s praise of Kuester’s game planning. This is the second time in recent memory that Kuester’s successfully mitigated the opposition’s best player (the other time being ‘Melo). These are solid coaching decisions that prove Kuester is really no slouch.
     
    In another world, he might actually be a good NBA coach. Yet, his inability to handle the personnel problems will be his downfall. With the glut of 2-guards on this team, his hands were tied from the beginning. I don’t know many coaches that would succeed in that situation. Yet, it would’ve been nice for the guy to figure out his rotation a little earlier.

  • Feb 9, 201112:21 pm
    by Laser

    Reply

    the bynum bashing is particularly hilarious coming from a fanbase who spent the last 2+ years watching a stuckey-led basketball team. bynum is so marginalized on this team, and there’s so much money being paid to our other guards, that you may as well consider all the production he gives you a “bonus,” and even if he’s stupendously bad (which he is rarely) it’s hard to point the finger at him when there are so many other guards (high priced ones, too!) for the coach to go to. maybe he just makes a good whipping boy or something. you don’t have to be a bynum fanboy to stand up for the guy.
     
    and if you’re comparing his ball-hogging tendencies to stuckey, it’s just not quite fair. this team made a major commitment to stuckey, was insanely patient with him, waiting for development that never came, and he truly had a different role than bynum ever has. he needed to be held to a higher standard. nobody ever accused bynum of being the future of the franchise. nobody ever put all their eggs in his basket. his role is to be a spark off the bench, create some chaos, try to make the right decision with the ball, whether it’s to shoot or to pass, and he does a good job more often than not.
     
    when you’ve got stuckey stinking up the place season after season, running the most stagnant offense the game’s ever seen; gordon collecting eight figures to be undersized and generally ineffective, truly earning his paycheck once in a blue moon; rip collecting dust… oh, and more money than anyone else on the roster… it’s patently ridiculous to complain about bynum. at all. tough to take these jokers seriously.
     
    this game was a formality, the boxscore academic. maybe it’s a loser’s mentality, but i don’t know how anyone could be upset when one of the worst teams in the league loses to the far and away absolute best. it’s a wonder the game was as competitive as it was, especially on a night the guards we’re bending over backwards to keep both laid eggs. i don’t know how much i would have blamed the team if they decided to stay home.

  • Feb 9, 20116:27 pm
    by detroitpcb

    Reply

    Laser – how can you bash Stuckey and praise Bynum when they both do the same thing – drive first, shoot second, pass later? Stuckey is at least a better defensive player.

    My argument with Bynum is that the second team never plays team ball when he is in the game. it is either – Will is hot and drives and shots or Will is a turnover shotblocked bust. it is never a team game on the offensive end. i find that frustrating to watch and i know the other players have to find it frustrating too.

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